Shaping identity in medieval French literature : the other within / edited by Adrian P. Tudor and Kristin L. Burr.

Contributor(s): Tudor, Adrian [editor.] | Burr, Kristin L [editor.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813057194; 0813057191Subject(s): Identity (Psychology) in literature | Literature and society -- FranceAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Shaping identity in medieval French literature.DDC classification: 840.9/001 LOC classification: PQ155.I35 | S53 2019Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction / Adrian P. Tudor and Kristin L. Burr -- The medieval moi multiple: names, surnames, and personifications / Douglas Kelly -- "Je veuil ung livre encommencier": the othernesses of Othon de Grandson's "Je" / Jane H.M. Taylor -- Huon de Bordeaux: the cultural dream as palimpsest / William Burgwinkle -- Roland's confession and the rhetorical construction of the other within / Mary Jane Schneck -- Ringing true: shifting identity in Le Roman de la Violette / Kristin L. Burr -- Inside out and outside in: (re- )reading the other in the cycle de Guillaume / Sara I. James -- Ami et Amile and Jean-Luc Nancy: friendship vs. community? / Jane Gilbert -- The devil inside: Merlin and the dark side of romance / Francis Gingras -- Melly and Merlin: locating little voices in Paris BnF fr. 24432 / James R. Simpson -- Sex, the church, and the medieval reader: shaping salvation in the Vie des P¿res / Adrian P. Tudor.
Summary: This collection of essays argues that literary identity can be created and re-created, adopted, refused, imposed, and self-imposed, and that one may exist within a group while remaining foreign to it. Contributors examine this theme through a wide range of lenses--from marginal characters to gender to questions of voice and naming--in works that span genres and historical periods.
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PQ155.I35 S53 2019 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvx0723s Available on1111663541

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction / Adrian P. Tudor and Kristin L. Burr -- The medieval moi multiple: names, surnames, and personifications / Douglas Kelly -- "Je veuil ung livre encommencier": the othernesses of Othon de Grandson's "Je" / Jane H.M. Taylor -- Huon de Bordeaux: the cultural dream as palimpsest / William Burgwinkle -- Roland's confession and the rhetorical construction of the other within / Mary Jane Schneck -- Ringing true: shifting identity in Le Roman de la Violette / Kristin L. Burr -- Inside out and outside in: (re- )reading the other in the cycle de Guillaume / Sara I. James -- Ami et Amile and Jean-Luc Nancy: friendship vs. community? / Jane Gilbert -- The devil inside: Merlin and the dark side of romance / Francis Gingras -- Melly and Merlin: locating little voices in Paris BnF fr. 24432 / James R. Simpson -- Sex, the church, and the medieval reader: shaping salvation in the Vie des P¿res / Adrian P. Tudor.

This collection of essays argues that literary identity can be created and re-created, adopted, refused, imposed, and self-imposed, and that one may exist within a group while remaining foreign to it. Contributors examine this theme through a wide range of lenses--from marginal characters to gender to questions of voice and naming--in works that span genres and historical periods.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This volume's ten essays, several by topflight scholars, examine a multiplicity of medieval works through the double lens of identity shaping and "the other within." This double focus blossoms kaleidoscopically. Discussed are Chrétien's Perceval, Guillaume de Lorris's Rose and the Tournoiement Antéchrist, plus selected later works, looked at from the perspective of personification. Other essays take up the fragmented selves in Othon de Grandson's Livre Messire Ode; cultural and religious identity in Huon de Bordeaux and the Guillaume cycle; a lost ring as key to recovered heroic identities in the Roman de la Violette; Jean-Luc Nancy's theory of "communialty" and Ami et Amile; the blurring of truth and fiction in numerous Arthurian narratives; the social resonances of Jehan de Saint-Quentin's rags-to-riches-to-rags tale Merlin Mellot; and the "sinner within" in the Vie des pères. The volume closes with a comparison of three main versions of Roland's confession, which Mary Jane Schenck looks at in the context of evolving medieval notions of self. The volume's appeal is enhanced by the contemporary relevance of its themes and its awareness of current related political controversies. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --Christine M. Reno, emerita, Vassar College

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