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Woman suffrage and the new democracy / Sara Hunter Graham.

By: Graham, Sara Hunter.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Haven, CT : Yale University Press, c1996Description: xviii, 234 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 0300063466 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780300063462 (cloth : alk. paper).Subject(s): Women -- Suffrage -- United States -- History | Suffragists -- United States -- History | National American Woman Suffrage Association -- HistoryDDC classification: 324.6/2/082 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Woman Suffrage in 1900 -- Anxiously Doubting Democracy -- The Suffrage Renaissance -- Building a Constituency -- The Front Door Lobby -- The Suffrage Machine -- Ratification -- Conclusion: Woman Suffrage and the New Democracy.
Summary: American suffragists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries worked in a political climate that was indifferent or even hostile to the extension of democratic rights. This engrossing book investigates how the woman suffrage movement achieved its goal by forging a highly organized and centrally controlled interest group, the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), one of the most effective single-issue pressure groups in the United States. Sara Hunter Graham examines the tactics and ideology of NAWSA and discusses what they tell us about pressure politics, women's rights, and American democracy.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JK1896 .G693 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001266600

Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-223) and index.

1. Woman Suffrage in 1900 -- 2. Anxiously Doubting Democracy -- 3. The Suffrage Renaissance -- 4. Building a Constituency -- 5. The Front Door Lobby -- 6. The Suffrage Machine -- 7. Ratification -- Conclusion: Woman Suffrage and the New Democracy.

American suffragists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries worked in a political climate that was indifferent or even hostile to the extension of democratic rights. This engrossing book investigates how the woman suffrage movement achieved its goal by forging a highly organized and centrally controlled interest group, the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), one of the most effective single-issue pressure groups in the United States. Sara Hunter Graham examines the tactics and ideology of NAWSA and discusses what they tell us about pressure politics, women's rights, and American democracy.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

According to Graham, the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), which organized the campaign for the 19th Amendment, inaugurated a new style of political activity for women: pressure group politics. But this narrowly focused study is chiefly a straightforward and useful organizational history of NAWSA from 1890 to 1920. Graham (history, Louisiana State Univ.) thus joins the boomlet of authors writing about women's suffrage (see Kristi Andersen's After Suffrage, LJ 8/15/96, and Marjorie Wheeler's One Woman, One Vote, LJ 11/1/95). As have other historians, Graham seeks to explain the apparent disintegration of the women's movement in the 1920s, but her narrow definition of which groups belonged to it renders her analysis incomplete. Recommended for large academic libraries.‘Cynthia Harrison, George Washington Univ., Washington, D.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Graham intends to "bring new life to an old story" and she does just that. The heroic struggle to gain national suffrage for women has been told many times, but Graham's account is more complex than the usual hagiographic retelling. The story focuses on the years 1900-1920, when the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) was reborn as a prototype of modern political pressure groups, with centralized control, professional organizers and lobbyists, a modern publicity bureau, standardized publicity and campaigns, and an obsessive concern for image. The strategy succeeded with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution. The how-to-do-it details of the reorganization are fascinating reading for the political pragmatist. But much of Graham's story demonstrates the irony that a movement intended to extend democracy had the unintended effect of moving the major feminist movement of the time in undemocratic directions. A must read in history and political science, with messages for present-day readers. All levels. S. S. Arpad; California State University, Fresno

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