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Building Anglo-Saxon England.

By: Blair, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (497 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400889907.Subject(s): Landscapes-England-History-To 1500 | Land settlement-England-History-To 1500 | Landscape archaeology-England | Anglo-Saxons | Great Britain-History-Anglo-Saxon period, 449-1066 | England-AntiquitiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Building Anglo-Saxon EnglandDDC classification: 942.017 LOC classification: DA152 .B535 2018Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Preface and Acknowledgements -- Source Citation Conventions -- Abbreviations -- PART I: Contexts -- Chapter 1: Exploring Anglo-Saxon Landscapes -- History, Geography, and Place Names -- The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon Settlements before the 1990s -- Gathering Knowledge: Academic Research, Contract Archaeology, and the Present Project -- Archaeology, History, Ethnography, and Reality -- The Scope and Themes of the Present Study -- Chapter 2: Defining Anglo-Saxon Landscapes -- Geography, Environment, and Older Human Landscapes -- Regional Diversity in Settlement and Material Culture -- Looking Westward: British, Irish, and Pictish Contexts for English Building Culture -- Looking Eastward: Scandinavian, Frisian, and Frankish Contexts for English Building Culture -- Self-Shaping -- Visible and Invisible Building Cultures: What Did Houses Really Look Like? -- In the Glare of the Headlamps: Pottery, Wooden Vessels, and the Distortions of Survival -- Order in the Built Environment: Monuments, Planning, and Linear Modules -- A Regional Framework for This Book -- A Chronological Framework for This Book -- Chapter 3: Landscapes of the Mind: The Built Environment in the Anglo-Saxon Consciousness -- Houses for Immortals: Unseen Residents in a Conceptual Landscape -- Houses for the Living: Life Cycles in Timber and the Transience of Earthly Dwellings -- Living with the Supernatural: Ritual Space in the Homestead -- Houses for Eternity: Monumentalising the Sacred in the Landscape -- A Mediterranean Religion in a Northern World: Two Cultures or One? -- Earth Moving and Ideology -- PART II: The First Transformation, circa 600-700 -- Chapter 4: Landscapes of Power and Wealth -- Centres and Peripheries: Royal Residence and Recreation -- The Mobile Environment of Royal Life.
The Background and Context of Seventh-Century Elite Sites -- The Great Hall Complexes: A Mode of Ostentatious Display -- The Great Hall Complexes: Local Territorial Contexts -- The Monasticisation of Royal Sites and the Era of Monastic Supremacy -- Retrospect: Gain and Loss in an Age of Transformations -- Chapter 5: The Construction of Settlement: Rural and Commercial Spaces -- 'Wandering Settlement' or 'Static Development'? Form and Regionality in English Settlements before 650 -- Circular Space: Concentrically Defined Zones and Radial Planning in the Insular Tradition -- Rectilinear Space: Gromatic Surveying and Grid-Planning -- The Seventh-Century Settlement Revolution: Organisation and Enclosure -- Grid-Planning in East Midland Settlements: The Diffusion of a Monastic Mode? -- Outside the Eastern Zone -- Urbanism in a Nonurban World: Holy Cities and Commercial Cities -- The Major Emporia before 700 -- Why Did So Much Change in the Seventh Century? -- PART III: Consolidation, circa 700-920 -- Chapter 6: Landscape Organisation and Economy in the Mercian Age -- Mercian Geopolitics -- Royal Ambitions and Monastic Assets: Compromise, Reform, and Predation in the Age of King Æthelbald -- Infrastructure: Linear Earthworks -- Infrastructure: Bridges -- Infrastructure: Forts -- Functional Place Names in -tūn: A World of Central Clusters, Not Complex Centres -- Mercian Centres and burh-tūnas: Eight Case Studies -- Mercian Territorial Organisation: Routes, Frontiers, and the Control of Kent -- Parallel Arrangements in Wessex -- Parallel Arrangements in Northumbria -- The Fruits of a Developed Infrastructure: Mercia's Golden Age, 780-820 -- Trauma and Legacy -- Chapter 7: Defence, Industry, and Commerce: From Central Clusters to Complex Centres -- The 'Burghal' Problem: The Tyranny of a Construct -- Reoccupied Iron Age Forts and Roman Towns.
Minsters as Strongholds -- Minor Earthwork Enclosures -- Major Formally Planned Defended Sites -- Intensification at the Grass Roots: Production, Processing, and Manufacture in the Rural Landscape -- Varieties of wīc: The Emporia and Beyond -- Centres and wīc-type Peripheries in Polyfocal Clusters: Two Alternative Outcomes -- Towards Urban Industries -- A Precocious Urban Axis: London, Rochester, and Canterbury -- Regrouping and Concentration, circa 850-920 -- Continuities: Trade, Production, and the Vikings -- Chapter 8: Rural Settlement and the 'Making of the English Village' -- Continuities and the Later Ninth Century: Rural Settlement Submerged? -- The Components of Settlement: Buildings, Groups of Buildings, and the Elusiveness of Great Halls -- Rural Settlements, circa 700-920: The Evidence -- Interpreting Semi-Nucleations: Settlement Structure in an 'Infield-Outfield' Economy -- Evolution or Design? Lordly and Spiritual Power within the Village -- Who Were the People? -- Spanning the 'Viking Age' -- PART IV: The Second Transformation, 920-1000 -- Chapter 9: Growth and Reconstruction: The Human Landscape Remodelled -- Intensification at All Levels: The Mid-Tenth- Century Watershed -- Gridded and Non-Gridded Settlements in the Eastern Zone and Beyond -- Spreading Southwestward: The Expanding Zone of Visible Settlement -- Arable Intensification, Open Fields, and the Shift to Heavier Soils -- Countryside and Town: A New Dichotomy -- Major Urban Places: The Formation of Townscapes and the Definition of House Plots -- Minor Urban Places: The Enduring Substratum of Markets and Minsters -- Chapter 10: Free Farmers and Emergent Lords: Towards the Manorial Landscape -- Contexts -- Differentiation and Complexity in Houses -- Differentiation and Complexity in Domestic Compounds -- Coexistent Halls: The Relatives Next Door?.
Boundaries, Enclosures, and Gates: The 'Burhgeat' Problem Revisited -- Churches -- Who Was Then the Gentleman? -- PART V: Beyond Anglo-Saxon Landscapes -- Chapter 11: The Eleventh Century: A New Built Environment -- Communications -- Towns -- Earthwork Castles -- Stone Castles -- Manors and Manor-Houses -- Churches and the 'Romanesque Revolution' -- Moving Business Indoors -- Rural Communities and Settlements -- Chapter 12: Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Illustration Sources and Credits -- Index.
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Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Preface and Acknowledgements -- Source Citation Conventions -- Abbreviations -- PART I: Contexts -- Chapter 1: Exploring Anglo-Saxon Landscapes -- History, Geography, and Place Names -- The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon Settlements before the 1990s -- Gathering Knowledge: Academic Research, Contract Archaeology, and the Present Project -- Archaeology, History, Ethnography, and Reality -- The Scope and Themes of the Present Study -- Chapter 2: Defining Anglo-Saxon Landscapes -- Geography, Environment, and Older Human Landscapes -- Regional Diversity in Settlement and Material Culture -- Looking Westward: British, Irish, and Pictish Contexts for English Building Culture -- Looking Eastward: Scandinavian, Frisian, and Frankish Contexts for English Building Culture -- Self-Shaping -- Visible and Invisible Building Cultures: What Did Houses Really Look Like? -- In the Glare of the Headlamps: Pottery, Wooden Vessels, and the Distortions of Survival -- Order in the Built Environment: Monuments, Planning, and Linear Modules -- A Regional Framework for This Book -- A Chronological Framework for This Book -- Chapter 3: Landscapes of the Mind: The Built Environment in the Anglo-Saxon Consciousness -- Houses for Immortals: Unseen Residents in a Conceptual Landscape -- Houses for the Living: Life Cycles in Timber and the Transience of Earthly Dwellings -- Living with the Supernatural: Ritual Space in the Homestead -- Houses for Eternity: Monumentalising the Sacred in the Landscape -- A Mediterranean Religion in a Northern World: Two Cultures or One? -- Earth Moving and Ideology -- PART II: The First Transformation, circa 600-700 -- Chapter 4: Landscapes of Power and Wealth -- Centres and Peripheries: Royal Residence and Recreation -- The Mobile Environment of Royal Life.

The Background and Context of Seventh-Century Elite Sites -- The Great Hall Complexes: A Mode of Ostentatious Display -- The Great Hall Complexes: Local Territorial Contexts -- The Monasticisation of Royal Sites and the Era of Monastic Supremacy -- Retrospect: Gain and Loss in an Age of Transformations -- Chapter 5: The Construction of Settlement: Rural and Commercial Spaces -- 'Wandering Settlement' or 'Static Development'? Form and Regionality in English Settlements before 650 -- Circular Space: Concentrically Defined Zones and Radial Planning in the Insular Tradition -- Rectilinear Space: Gromatic Surveying and Grid-Planning -- The Seventh-Century Settlement Revolution: Organisation and Enclosure -- Grid-Planning in East Midland Settlements: The Diffusion of a Monastic Mode? -- Outside the Eastern Zone -- Urbanism in a Nonurban World: Holy Cities and Commercial Cities -- The Major Emporia before 700 -- Why Did So Much Change in the Seventh Century? -- PART III: Consolidation, circa 700-920 -- Chapter 6: Landscape Organisation and Economy in the Mercian Age -- Mercian Geopolitics -- Royal Ambitions and Monastic Assets: Compromise, Reform, and Predation in the Age of King Æthelbald -- Infrastructure: Linear Earthworks -- Infrastructure: Bridges -- Infrastructure: Forts -- Functional Place Names in -tūn: A World of Central Clusters, Not Complex Centres -- Mercian Centres and burh-tūnas: Eight Case Studies -- Mercian Territorial Organisation: Routes, Frontiers, and the Control of Kent -- Parallel Arrangements in Wessex -- Parallel Arrangements in Northumbria -- The Fruits of a Developed Infrastructure: Mercia's Golden Age, 780-820 -- Trauma and Legacy -- Chapter 7: Defence, Industry, and Commerce: From Central Clusters to Complex Centres -- The 'Burghal' Problem: The Tyranny of a Construct -- Reoccupied Iron Age Forts and Roman Towns.

Minsters as Strongholds -- Minor Earthwork Enclosures -- Major Formally Planned Defended Sites -- Intensification at the Grass Roots: Production, Processing, and Manufacture in the Rural Landscape -- Varieties of wīc: The Emporia and Beyond -- Centres and wīc-type Peripheries in Polyfocal Clusters: Two Alternative Outcomes -- Towards Urban Industries -- A Precocious Urban Axis: London, Rochester, and Canterbury -- Regrouping and Concentration, circa 850-920 -- Continuities: Trade, Production, and the Vikings -- Chapter 8: Rural Settlement and the 'Making of the English Village' -- Continuities and the Later Ninth Century: Rural Settlement Submerged? -- The Components of Settlement: Buildings, Groups of Buildings, and the Elusiveness of Great Halls -- Rural Settlements, circa 700-920: The Evidence -- Interpreting Semi-Nucleations: Settlement Structure in an 'Infield-Outfield' Economy -- Evolution or Design? Lordly and Spiritual Power within the Village -- Who Were the People? -- Spanning the 'Viking Age' -- PART IV: The Second Transformation, 920-1000 -- Chapter 9: Growth and Reconstruction: The Human Landscape Remodelled -- Intensification at All Levels: The Mid-Tenth- Century Watershed -- Gridded and Non-Gridded Settlements in the Eastern Zone and Beyond -- Spreading Southwestward: The Expanding Zone of Visible Settlement -- Arable Intensification, Open Fields, and the Shift to Heavier Soils -- Countryside and Town: A New Dichotomy -- Major Urban Places: The Formation of Townscapes and the Definition of House Plots -- Minor Urban Places: The Enduring Substratum of Markets and Minsters -- Chapter 10: Free Farmers and Emergent Lords: Towards the Manorial Landscape -- Contexts -- Differentiation and Complexity in Houses -- Differentiation and Complexity in Domestic Compounds -- Coexistent Halls: The Relatives Next Door?.

Boundaries, Enclosures, and Gates: The 'Burhgeat' Problem Revisited -- Churches -- Who Was Then the Gentleman? -- PART V: Beyond Anglo-Saxon Landscapes -- Chapter 11: The Eleventh Century: A New Built Environment -- Communications -- Towns -- Earthwork Castles -- Stone Castles -- Manors and Manor-Houses -- Churches and the 'Romanesque Revolution' -- Moving Business Indoors -- Rural Communities and Settlements -- Chapter 12: Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Illustration Sources and Credits -- Index.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

John Blair is Professor of Medieval History and Archaeology at the University of Oxford and Fellow in History at The Queen's College. His books include The Church in Anglo-Saxon Society and The Anglo-Saxon Age: A Very Short Introduction .

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