Arming and disarming : a history of gun control in Canada / R. Blake Brown.

By: Brown, R. BlakeMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Toronto : University of Toronto Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 349 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1442665599; 9781442665590; 9781442665606; 1442665602Subject(s): Gun control -- Canada -- History | Firearms -- Law and legislation -- Canada | Armes à feu -- Contrôle -- Canada -- Histoire | Armes à feu -- Droit -- CanadaAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 363.330971 LOC classification: HV7439.C2 | B76 2012Other classification: 15.85 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
1 "Every man has a right to the possession of his musket": Regulating Firearms before Confederation -- 2 "The government must disarm all the Indians": Controlling Firearms from Confederation to the Late-Nineteenth Century -- 3 "A rifle in the hands of every able-bodied man in the Dominion of Canada under proper auspices": Arming Britons and Disarming Immigrants from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Great War -- 4 "Hysterical legislation": Suppressing Gun Ownership from the First to the Second World Wars -- 5 Angry White Men: Resistance to Gun Control in Canada, 1946-1980 -- 6 Flexing the Liberal State's Muscles: The Montreal Massacre and the 1995 Firearms Act, 1980-2006 -- Conclusion.
Summary: Arming and Disarming provides a careful exploration of how social, economic, cultural, legal, and constitutional concerns shaped gun legislation and its implementation, as well as how these factors defined Canada's historical and contemporary 'gun culture.'
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HV7439.C2 B76 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/9781442665590 Available ocn823831023

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

1 "Every man has a right to the possession of his musket": Regulating Firearms before Confederation -- 2 "The government must disarm all the Indians": Controlling Firearms from Confederation to the Late-Nineteenth Century -- 3 "A rifle in the hands of every able-bodied man in the Dominion of Canada under proper auspices": Arming Britons and Disarming Immigrants from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Great War -- 4 "Hysterical legislation": Suppressing Gun Ownership from the First to the Second World Wars -- 5 Angry White Men: Resistance to Gun Control in Canada, 1946-1980 -- 6 Flexing the Liberal State's Muscles: The Montreal Massacre and the 1995 Firearms Act, 1980-2006 -- Conclusion.

Arming and Disarming provides a careful exploration of how social, economic, cultural, legal, and constitutional concerns shaped gun legislation and its implementation, as well as how these factors defined Canada's historical and contemporary 'gun culture.'

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Brown's book appears in the aftermath of the Conservative Harper government's repeal of the Firearms Act, or the "long-gun registry," as it was known, though it also covered handguns. The law had received royal assent in 1995 on the sixth anniversary of the "Montreal Massacre," when 25-year-old Marc Lepine shot 28 people--most of them women--at the Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal, an event that made gun registry a feminist issue. Opposition was fierce, particularly in the western provinces where the Harper government had its political base, and once the registry's cost overruns were reported, public support eroded. Gun control in Canada has a long history. A citizen property-owner's right to possess a musket rested upon the English Bill of Rights of 1689, though the right might be restricted for persons suspected of disloyalty. Until the Firearms Act of 1995, successive governments felt they lacked the political muscle to enforce a gun registry law. Yet the act survived challenges in the courts, and it appears to be working: the homicide rate involving firearms fell by half between the 1970s and 2010. But for the moment, Conservative Party ideology has trumped evidence. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. J. A. S. Evans emeritus, University of British Columbia

Author notes provided by Syndetics

BrownR. Blake:

R. Blake Brown is a professor in the Department of History and Atlantic Canada Studies at Saint Mary's University.

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