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Game of privilege : an African American history of golf / by Lane Demas.

By: Demas, Lane [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, [2017]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469634234; 1469634236; 9781469634241; 1469634244.Subject(s): African American golfers -- History | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History | Golf -- Social aspects -- United States | Golf -- United States -- History | Discrimination in sports -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Game of privilege.DDC classification: 796.3520973 LOC classification: GV981 | .D45 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Real democracy is found on the links : African Americans and the origins of golf in the United States -- One hears of Negro country clubs : golfing the Great Migration and Harlem Renaissance -- Our masters : the development of the United Golfers Association -- I will take your own golf stick and wham the world : golf and the postwar civil rights movement -- Guns in their golf bags : Black Power on the links -- Thai people don't get hate mail : race and golf in the age of Tiger Woods.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
GV981 .D45 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469634234_demas Available on1001251240

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Real democracy is found on the links : African Americans and the origins of golf in the United States -- One hears of Negro country clubs : golfing the Great Migration and Harlem Renaissance -- Our masters : the development of the United Golfers Association -- I will take your own golf stick and wham the world : golf and the postwar civil rights movement -- Guns in their golf bags : Black Power on the links -- Thai people don't get hate mail : race and golf in the age of Tiger Woods.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Demas chronicles the history of golf for African Americans, at least until the mid-1960s, as on separate and often unequal footing. In many ways, this mirrored the travails of the civil rights movement. While there are a number of books on golf, few (for instance, Pete McDaniel's Uneven Lies: The Heroic Story of African-Americans in Golf) deal with the subject of race. In this account, Demas presents a considerable amount of research on private and municipal golf clubs as well as the barriers placed on African American players by governmental regulations, the PGA, and USGA. Verdict There are a number of lessons to be learned from this book, and one might want to consider this history through an LGBTQ lens as well. An unsettling but solid perspective on America.-Steven Silkunas, Fernandina Beach, FL © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The popular perception of golf is that it is a game for elite white players with time and money to play. Demas (history, Central Michigan Univ.) has carefully researched and deftly describes the long, rich, and lesser-known history of African American golfers. He argues that African Americans have helped the game evolve since the late 19th century. He weaves into the backdrop of American history the experiences of individuals such as George Franklin Grant, who patented an early golf tee in 1899, and families such as the Holmes family, who won a Supreme Court battle in 1955 to desegregate the public golf courses of Atlanta. Demas highlights the profound importance of the United Golfers Association (UGA), which was open to all races, unlike the whites-only Professional Golfers' Association (PGA). The UGA also had a thriving branch for women's golf decades before the Ladies Professional Golf Association was founded. Demas also traces the history of the Civil Rights Movement through the African American golfing experience, the racial integration of the PGA, and the emergence of Tiger Woods. This book is layered, fascinating, and tells an important history. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. --Sarah K. Fields, University of Colorado-Denver

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