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Despotism on demand : how power operates in the flexible workplace / Alex J. Wood.

By: Wood, Alex J, 1985- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Ithaca : ILR Press, an imprint of Cornell University Press, 2020Copyright date: ©2020Description: 1 online resource (ix, 178 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501748905; 1501748904; 9781501748899; 1501748890.Subject(s): Flexible work arrangements -- Great Britain | Flexible work arrangements -- United States | Hours of labor -- Great Britain | Hours of labor -- United States | Precarious employment -- Great Britain | Precarious employment -- United States | Industrial relations -- Great Britain | Industrial relations -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Despotism on demandDDC classification: 331.25/7240941 LOC classification: HD5109.2.G7 | W64 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Internal states in the UK -- Internal states in the USA -- Despotic time in the UK : overcoming hegemonic constraints -- Despotic time in the USA : undermining worker organization -- The dynamics of work and scheduling gifts -- Limits of control and spaces of resistance -- Conclusions : control in the 21st century.
Summary: "Experiences of paid work have shifted radically over the last 30 years with the rise of flexible scheduling and the gig economy. In this book, Alex Wood attempts to provide an updated account of power in this changing economy. With in-depth case studies of two of the largest retail businesses in the world, one in the United States and one in the United Kingdom, he sheds light on a new despotic mode of domination in which managers discipline workers through reducing the quantity, stability, and sociability of their hours. In turn workers must continually strive to maintain their manager's favor in the hope of receiving 'schedule gifts', the granting of additional hours and the rearranging of schedules. Workers experience the operation of flexible scheduling as acts of kindness. As such, schedule gifts bind workers to their managers' interests through feelings of gratitude and moral obligation. In this way precarious scheduling gives rise to what is a new regime of power for the on-demand economy"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD5109.2.G7 W64 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctvq2w48n Available on1111640237

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Internal states in the UK -- Internal states in the USA -- Despotic time in the UK : overcoming hegemonic constraints -- Despotic time in the USA : undermining worker organization -- The dynamics of work and scheduling gifts -- Limits of control and spaces of resistance -- Conclusions : control in the 21st century.

"Experiences of paid work have shifted radically over the last 30 years with the rise of flexible scheduling and the gig economy. In this book, Alex Wood attempts to provide an updated account of power in this changing economy. With in-depth case studies of two of the largest retail businesses in the world, one in the United States and one in the United Kingdom, he sheds light on a new despotic mode of domination in which managers discipline workers through reducing the quantity, stability, and sociability of their hours. In turn workers must continually strive to maintain their manager's favor in the hope of receiving 'schedule gifts', the granting of additional hours and the rearranging of schedules. Workers experience the operation of flexible scheduling as acts of kindness. As such, schedule gifts bind workers to their managers' interests through feelings of gratitude and moral obligation. In this way precarious scheduling gives rise to what is a new regime of power for the on-demand economy"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on April 21, 2020).

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Alex J. Wood is Lecturer in the Sociology of Work at the University of Birmingham and a Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. Follow him on Twitter @tom_swing.</p>

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