The Los Alamos Primer : the First Lectures on How to Build an Atomic Bomb / Robert Serber ; annotated by Robert Serber, updated with a New Introduction by Richard Rhodes.

By: Serber, RobertMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Oakland : University of California Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (164 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0520374339; 9780520374331Subject(s): Atomic bomb -- United States -- History | Physicists -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Alamos Primer : The First Lectures on How to Build an Atomic Bomb, Updated with a New Introduction by Richard Rhodes.DDC classification: 623.4/5119 LOC classification: QC773.A1 | S47 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- The Los Alamos Primer -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Introduction -- Preface -- The Los Alamos Primer -- 1 Object -- 2 Energy of Fission Process -- 3 Fast Neutron Chain Reaction -- 4 Fission Cross-sections -- 5 Neutron Spectrum -- 6 Neutron Number -- 7 Neutron Capture -- 8 Why Ordinary U Is Safe -- 9 Material 49 -- 10 Simplest Estimate of Minimum Size of Bomb -- 11 Effect of Tamper -- 12 Damage -- 13 Efficiency -- 14 Effect of Tamper on Efficiency -- 15 Detonation -- 16 Probability of Predetonation -- 17 Fizzles -- 18 Detonating Source -- 19 Neutron Background -- 20 Shooting -- 21 Autocatalytic Methods -- 22 Conclusion
Summary: More than seventy years ago, American forces exploded the first atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, causing great physical and human destruction. The young scientists at Los Alamos who developed the bombs, which were nicknamed Little Boy and Fat Man, were introduced to the basic principles and goals of the project in March 1943, at a crash course in new weapons technology. The lecturer was physicist Robert Serber, J. Robert Oppenheimer's protégé, and the scientists learned that their job was to design and build the world's first atomic bombs. Notes on Serber's lect.
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QC773.A1 S47 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvw1d5pf Available on1138682309

Print version record.

Cover -- The Los Alamos Primer -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Introduction -- Preface -- The Los Alamos Primer -- 1 Object -- 2 Energy of Fission Process -- 3 Fast Neutron Chain Reaction -- 4 Fission Cross-sections -- 5 Neutron Spectrum -- 6 Neutron Number -- 7 Neutron Capture -- 8 Why Ordinary U Is Safe -- 9 Material 49 -- 10 Simplest Estimate of Minimum Size of Bomb -- 11 Effect of Tamper -- 12 Damage -- 13 Efficiency -- 14 Effect of Tamper on Efficiency -- 15 Detonation -- 16 Probability of Predetonation -- 17 Fizzles -- 18 Detonating Source -- 19 Neutron Background -- 20 Shooting -- 21 Autocatalytic Methods -- 22 Conclusion

More than seventy years ago, American forces exploded the first atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, causing great physical and human destruction. The young scientists at Los Alamos who developed the bombs, which were nicknamed Little Boy and Fat Man, were introduced to the basic principles and goals of the project in March 1943, at a crash course in new weapons technology. The lecturer was physicist Robert Serber, J. Robert Oppenheimer's protégé, and the scientists learned that their job was to design and build the world's first atomic bombs. Notes on Serber's lect.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 23, 2020).

Author notes provided by Syndetics

SerberRobert:

Robert Serber (March 14, 1909 - June 1, 1997) was an American physicist who participated in the Manhattan Project. Serber's lectures explaining the basic principles and goals of the project were printed and supplied to all incoming scientific staff, and became known as The Los Alamos Primer . The New York Times called him "the intellectual midwife at the birth of the atomic bomb."

Richard Rhodes won a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award for The Making of the Atomic Bomb . He subsequently published three further volumes of nuclear history: Dark Sun , Arsenals of Folly , and The Twilight of the Bombs .

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