Put your hands on your hips and act like a woman : Black history and poetics in performance / Gale P. Jackson.

By: Jackson, Gale, 1958- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (xvii, 225 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781496220905; 1496220900; 9781496220929; 1496220927; 9781496220912; 1496220919Subject(s): African American women -- Music -- History and criticism | Slaves -- Southern States -- Music -- History and criticism | African Americans -- Music -- History and criticism | African American dance -- History | African American women dancers | African Americans -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 305.48/896073 LOC classification: ML3556 | .J405 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Way we do -- Juba danced -- The ancestors and the lullaby -- Put your hands on your hips : rites of passage in performance -- Rosy, Possum, Morning Star : work songs and the blues -- Coda.
Summary: "Gale P. Jackson describes and reimagines the ways women of the African diaspora have drawn on ancient traditions to record memory, history, and experience with dance and explores the narratives, articulations of agency, and constructions of identity embedded in women's cultural performance. In engaging these vibrant traditions, "Put Your Hands on Your Hips and Act Like a Woman" provides a window into multiple discourses and new paradigms for locating the history, philosophy, and theory embedded in Black traditions"-- Provided by publisher.
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ML3556 .J405 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvxrpxj0 Available on1141666543

"Gale P. Jackson describes and reimagines the ways women of the African diaspora have drawn on ancient traditions to record memory, history, and experience with dance and explores the narratives, articulations of agency, and constructions of identity embedded in women's cultural performance. In engaging these vibrant traditions, "Put Your Hands on Your Hips and Act Like a Woman" provides a window into multiple discourses and new paradigms for locating the history, philosophy, and theory embedded in Black traditions"-- Provided by publisher.

The Way we do -- Juba danced -- The ancestors and the lullaby -- Put your hands on your hips : rites of passage in performance -- Rosy, Possum, Morning Star : work songs and the blues -- Coda.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 17, 2020).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Engaging with voices from the African diaspora and with African American and American literature, Jackson (interdisciplinary arts, Goddard College) focuses on performance traditions--music and dance--that become "a narrative of journey, story, cultural history, ancestry, and cosmology" (p. 6). The works Jackson studies date from the 16th century through the 20th, and she draws on feminist criticism from scholars such as Toni Cade Bambara, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, and Anna Julia Cooper to investigate historical (and herstorical) perspectives. The five chapters take up creation stories, personal narrative, analysis, criticism, and historical connections, focusing on "storytelling as a place of deep knowledge, pedagogy, and inclusive truth" (p. 8). Jackson investigates cultural performance and offers myriad ways to consider the pieces. As she cycles through artistic artifacts, she concludes that "Black song and motion" tell a "collective autobiography" (p. 10). Both relatable and scholarly, this is a fascinating and original study. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; professionals. --Theresa L. Stowell, Adrian College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gale P. Jackson is a poet, writer, and Africanist scholar. She is a professor of interdisciplinary arts at Goddard College and the author of MeDea and We Stand Our Ground: Three Women, Their Vision, Their Poems .

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