Thunder on the river : the Civil War in northeast Florida / Daniel L. Schafer.

By: Schafer, Daniel LMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, [2010]Copyright date: ©2010Description: 1 online resource (xi, 348 pages) : illustrations, mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813037424; 0813037425Subject(s): Jacksonville (Fla.) -- History, Military -- 19th century | Jacksonville (Fla.) -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Saint Johns River Region (Fla.) -- History, Military -- 19th century | Saint Johns River Region (Fla.) -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Florida -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 | HISTORY -- United States -- State & Local -- South (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV) | Social conditions | Florida | Florida -- Jacksonville | Florida -- Saint Johns River Region | Regions & Countries - Americas | History & Archaeology | United States Local History | HISTORY / United States / State & Local / South (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, VA, WV) | American Civil War (United States : 1861-1865) | 1800-1899Genre/Form: Electronic book. | Electronic books. | History. | Military history.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Thunder on the riverDDC classification: 975.9/1205 LOC classification: F319.J1 | S35 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; 1. "Raise the Banner of Secession": Sectional Debates in Jacksonville, 1845-1861; 2. Jacksonville Prepares for War; 3. A Pathway into the Heart of East Florida; 4. The First Occupation of Jacksonville; 5. Freedom Was as Close as the River; 6. Debacle at St. Johns Bluff, and the Second Occupation of Jacksonville; 7. Unionists in Exile; 8. "These Are United States Troops and They Will Not Dishonor the Flag": The Third Occupation of Jacksonville; 9. "To Redeem Florida from the Rebels": The Fourth Occupation of Jacksonville.
10. Thunder on the River: Torpedo Warfare and the Struggle for Control of Northeast Florida11. The Struggle for Allegiance of Florida Residents; 12. "The Storm Has Ceased": Life for Jacksonville's White Residents during the Federal Occupation; 13. A Troubled Transition to Freedom: Life for Jacksonville's Black Residents during the Federal Occupation; Acknowledgments; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y.
Summary: When the Civil War finally came to North Florida, it did so with an intermittent fury that destroyed much of Jacksonville and scattered its residents. The city was taken four separate times by Federal forces but abandoned after each of the first three occupations. During the fourth occupation, it was used as a staging ground for the ill-fated Union invasion of the Florida interior, which ended in the bloody Battle of Olustee in February 1864. This late Confederate victory, along with the deadly use of underwater mines against the U.S. Navy along the St. Johns, nearly succeeded in ending the f.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F319.J1 S35 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvx0772j Available ocn861693045

Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-329) and index.

Print version record.

Cover; Contents; Preface; 1. "Raise the Banner of Secession": Sectional Debates in Jacksonville, 1845-1861; 2. Jacksonville Prepares for War; 3. A Pathway into the Heart of East Florida; 4. The First Occupation of Jacksonville; 5. Freedom Was as Close as the River; 6. Debacle at St. Johns Bluff, and the Second Occupation of Jacksonville; 7. Unionists in Exile; 8. "These Are United States Troops and They Will Not Dishonor the Flag": The Third Occupation of Jacksonville; 9. "To Redeem Florida from the Rebels": The Fourth Occupation of Jacksonville.

10. Thunder on the River: Torpedo Warfare and the Struggle for Control of Northeast Florida11. The Struggle for Allegiance of Florida Residents; 12. "The Storm Has Ceased": Life for Jacksonville's White Residents during the Federal Occupation; 13. A Troubled Transition to Freedom: Life for Jacksonville's Black Residents during the Federal Occupation; Acknowledgments; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y.

When the Civil War finally came to North Florida, it did so with an intermittent fury that destroyed much of Jacksonville and scattered its residents. The city was taken four separate times by Federal forces but abandoned after each of the first three occupations. During the fourth occupation, it was used as a staging ground for the ill-fated Union invasion of the Florida interior, which ended in the bloody Battle of Olustee in February 1864. This late Confederate victory, along with the deadly use of underwater mines against the U.S. Navy along the St. Johns, nearly succeeded in ending the f.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Schafer (emer., Univ. of North Florida) chronicles the unique events that occurred in often-overlooked northeastern Florida during the Civil War. His research extends beyond the military operations as he details how the presence of the war affected the lives of local white citizens and the thousands of slaves in the region. Much of the book focuses on the war-torn city of Jacksonville, which exchanged hands several times during the conflict and endured a contentious occupation by Union troops. However, Schafer still presents sound analysis of the key campaigns, including the Union's disastrous invasion of the Florida interior in early 1864. The author excels at tying this local history to a national context by exploring the development of the area's political landscape dating back to the Missouri Compromise and connecting the controversies over race, occupation, economics, and other key social issues. His narrative benefits from exceptional use of primary source material and suffers only from an absence of useful maps. Readers will appreciate the complicated nature of the Civil War overall through this engaging and useful regional case study. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. B. A. Wineman Marine Corps University

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