Origins of the dream : Hughes's poetry and King's rhetoric / W. Jason Miller.

By: Miller, W. Jason [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813055183; 0813055180; 9780813050713; 0813050715Subject(s): Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967 -- Influence | King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968 | Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967 | King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968 | Hughes, Langston 1902-1967 | King, Martin Luther 1929-1968 | American poetry -- African American authors | African Americans -- History | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African American poets -- 20th century | LITERARY CRITICISM -- American -- General | African American poets | African Americans | American poetry -- African American authors | Civil rights movements | Influence (Literary, artistic, etc.) | United States | Rezeption | Rhetorik | Bürgerrechtsbewegung | LITERARY CRITICISM / American / African American | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Origins of the dreamDDC classification: 818/.5209 LOC classification: PS3515.U274 | Z6844 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: giving new validity to old forms -- "Mother to son": the rise, removal, and return of Hughes -- Black and red: accusations of subversiveness -- King and poetry: quotations, revisions, and unsolicited poems -- "Dream deferred": King's use of Hughes's most popular poem -- "Poem for a man": King's unusual request -- "Youth": Hughes's poem and King's chiasmus -- "I dream a world": rewriting Hughes's signature poem -- "I have a dream": King speaks in Rocky Mount -- "The Psalm of brotherhood": King at Detroit's march for jobs -- The march on Washington: veiling Hughes's poetry -- Conclusion: extending the dream.
Summary: Since Martin Luther King Jr.'s 'I Have a Dream' speech, some scholars have privately suspected that King's 'dream' was connected to Langston Hughes's poetry. Drawing on archival materials, including notes, correspondence, and marginalia, W. Jason Miller provides a completely original and compelling argument that Hughes's influence on King's rhetoric was, in fact, evident in more than just the one famous speech.
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Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: giving new validity to old forms -- "Mother to son": the rise, removal, and return of Hughes -- Black and red: accusations of subversiveness -- King and poetry: quotations, revisions, and unsolicited poems -- "Dream deferred": King's use of Hughes's most popular poem -- "Poem for a man": King's unusual request -- "Youth": Hughes's poem and King's chiasmus -- "I dream a world": rewriting Hughes's signature poem -- "I have a dream": King speaks in Rocky Mount -- "The Psalm of brotherhood": King at Detroit's march for jobs -- The march on Washington: veiling Hughes's poetry -- Conclusion: extending the dream.

Since Martin Luther King Jr.'s 'I Have a Dream' speech, some scholars have privately suspected that King's 'dream' was connected to Langston Hughes's poetry. Drawing on archival materials, including notes, correspondence, and marginalia, W. Jason Miller provides a completely original and compelling argument that Hughes's influence on King's rhetoric was, in fact, evident in more than just the one famous speech.

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CHOICE Review

In volume 2 of his The Life of Langston Hughes (CH, Feb'89, 26-3155), Arnold Rampersad suggested that Martin Luther King Jr. was well aware of the poetry of Langston Hughes and sometimes recited Hughes's poems in his sermons and speeches. Miller (English, North Carolina State Univ.) documents how extensively King utilized the poems and vocabulary of Hughes. Certainly King was inspired by the "American dream." However, King often recited Hughes's "Mother to Son" and commented that life for black people was no "crystal stair." He borrowed from and paraphrased "Let America Be America Again": "let it be the dream that the dreamers dreamed." He borrowed from "What Happens to a Dream Deferred" when he alluded to shattered dreams and deferred dreams. He also borrowed from "I Dream a World." This brilliant, thoroughly researched book shows how King often had to hide direct mention of Hughes even as he borrowed from his dream motif, because J. Edgar Hoover maintained that Hughes was a communist. Miller's book will help correct the historical amnesia that has for too long blotted out recognition of the cultural continuity between Hughes and King. A masterpiece. Summing Up: Essential. All readers. --Wayne C. Glasker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

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