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A curious peril : H.D.'s late modernist prose / Lara Vetter.

By: Vetter, Lara Elizabeth, 1968- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813052731; 0813052734.Subject(s): H. D. (Hilda Doolittle), 1886-1961 -- Criticism and interpretation | H. D. (Hilda Doolittle), 1886-1961 | Modernism (Literature) -- United States -- History | Poets, American -- 20th century -- Biography | LITERARY CRITICISM -- Poetry | Modernism (Literature) | Poets, American | United States | LITERARY CRITICISM / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Biographies. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. | History.DDC classification: 811/.52 LOC classification: PS3507.O726 | Z886 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
H.D.'s post-World War II writings: a chronology -- Introduction -- De-formations: trauma, genre, and the sword went out to sea -- Autobiography and ghost story -- Mysticism and time travel -- Märchen and historical fiction -- Critique: gendered narratives of nation and imperialism -- By Avon River, arranged marriage, and Shakespeare's empire -- Disappearing bodies in white rose and the red -- Interlude -- The mystery -- Re-formations: postwar ethics and identity -- Facing the past, becoming l'Autre -- The invisible other: the psychoanalyst as spy.
Summary: This book argues that the trauma the modernist writer H.D. endured during World War II birthed a body of writing strikingly different from that of her earlier career. Vetter's study focuses on the author's post-war prose which has received little critical attention relative to her Imagist poetry. These postwar writings bring together the material, political world with the realm of the mystical and otherworldly--the other hallmark of H.D.'s writing. Ultimately, Vetter shines a much-needed light on these late works to reveal a more complete picture of H.D.'s oeuvre and provide an invaluable source for future modernist scholarship.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS3507.O726 Z886 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvx0795w Available ocn990142229

Includes bibliographical references and index.

H.D.'s post-World War II writings: a chronology -- Introduction -- De-formations: trauma, genre, and the sword went out to sea -- Autobiography and ghost story -- Mysticism and time travel -- Märchen and historical fiction -- Critique: gendered narratives of nation and imperialism -- By Avon River, arranged marriage, and Shakespeare's empire -- Disappearing bodies in white rose and the red -- Interlude -- The mystery -- Re-formations: postwar ethics and identity -- Facing the past, becoming l'Autre -- The invisible other: the psychoanalyst as spy.

This book argues that the trauma the modernist writer H.D. endured during World War II birthed a body of writing strikingly different from that of her earlier career. Vetter's study focuses on the author's post-war prose which has received little critical attention relative to her Imagist poetry. These postwar writings bring together the material, political world with the realm of the mystical and otherworldly--the other hallmark of H.D.'s writing. Ultimately, Vetter shines a much-needed light on these late works to reveal a more complete picture of H.D.'s oeuvre and provide an invaluable source for future modernist scholarship.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed June 15, 2017).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A Curious Peril is an exemplary scholarly work: exceptionally well researched, consistently smart, accessible. Drawing her title from an H. D. verse ("Loss"), Vetter (Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte) focuses on H. D.'s less-known, post-WW II writing. Vetter makes a persuasive case for the impact on H. D. of living through both world wars in London and experiencing the Nazi blitz. Starting as an imagist, H. D. (1886-1961) transitioned to an emphasis on war, nation, time, and the intersection of imperialism and patriarchy in her later work. A Curious Peril is grounded in previous criticism of H. D. and in theories of autobiography, genre, and intertextuality. Of particular interest is the description of H. D.'s library holdings and reading habits--an invaluable appendix lists books H. D. owned and/or read--and how those books interacted with her own works. Vetter provides close readings of By Avon River, The Sword Went Out to Sea, and White Rose and the Red, all written in the 1940s, and of work published in the 1950s. Sword, Vetter argues, is a postmodern pastiche of autobiography, ghost story, mysticism, science fiction, fairy tale, and historical fiction. By interrogating the very nature of narrative, H. D. gestured toward the trauma of war and the Holocaust. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Elizabeth R. Baer, Gustavus Adolphus College

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