Vagrants and Vagabonds : Poverty and Mobility in the Early American Republic.

By: O'Brassill-Kulfan, KristinMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksEarly American Places Ser: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, 2019Description: 1 online resource (171 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781479833207; 1479833207Subject(s): Rogues and vagabonds -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Vagrancy -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Poor -- United States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Social conditions -- 19th century | Poor | Rogues and vagabonds | Social conditions | Vagrancy | United States | 1800-1899Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Vagrants and Vagabonds : Poverty and Mobility in the Early American Republic.DDC classification: 305.5/692097309034 LOC classification: HV4505 | .O373 2019Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Introduction; 1 "She Is Doubtless a Very Vagrant": Poverty and Mobility on the Legal Landscape; 2 "A Wandering Life": The Physical Landscape of Indigent Transiency; 3 "The Removal of So Many Human Beings ... Like Felons": Forced Migration of the Poor; 4 "Since He Was Free": Vagabondage, Race, and Emancipation; 5 "Punishment for Their Misfortunes": Discretion, Incarceration, and Resistance; 6 "It Was amongst the Vagrant Class ... That Cholera Was Most Fatal": Mobility, Poverty, and Disease; Conclusion; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations
AppendixNotes; Index; About the Author
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HV4505 .O373 2019 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvwrm418 Available on1078996860

Print version record.

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Introduction; 1 "She Is Doubtless a Very Vagrant": Poverty and Mobility on the Legal Landscape; 2 "A Wandering Life": The Physical Landscape of Indigent Transiency; 3 "The Removal of So Many Human Beings ... Like Felons": Forced Migration of the Poor; 4 "Since He Was Free": Vagabondage, Race, and Emancipation; 5 "Punishment for Their Misfortunes": Discretion, Incarceration, and Resistance; 6 "It Was amongst the Vagrant Class ... That Cholera Was Most Fatal": Mobility, Poverty, and Disease; Conclusion; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations

AppendixNotes; Index; About the Author

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this tightly focused study, O'Brassill-Kulfan (Rutgers) studies vagrancy and migration in the early American republic as a window into a broader understanding of poverty. O'Brassill-Kulfan coins the term "indigent transiency" to describe the mass of poor laborers who sought employment in the post--War of 1812 industrializing US. Like many students of labor and social history in the early republic, O'Brassill-Kulfan blames the growth of capitalism and industrialization for a "financial calamity for the poor," from which many could not recover. Moreover, local and state authorities developed a system of laws designed to punish indigent transients. Excessive mobility came to be seen as a function of vagrancy, and communities borrowed from the British tradition to codify laws designed to punish it. Pauper removal, whereby communities forced migrants to relocate, became one of the more extreme measures taken to rid communities of vagrants. Vagrancy and, by extension, poverty came to be viewed as a moral condition in addition to an economic status. Steeped in the intersections of race, class, and gender with labor history, O'Brassill-Kulfan's study will appeal to scholars in these areas. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students through faculty. --Christopher Childers, Pittsburg State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

O'Brassill-KulfanKristin:

Kristin O'Brassill-Kulfan is Instructor in the Department of History at Rutgers University.

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