Postcinematic vision : the coevolution of moving-image media and the spectator / Roger F. Cook.

By: Cook, Roger F, 1948- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPosthumanities: 54.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (238 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781452961231; 1452961239; 9781452961224; 1452961220Subject(s): Mass media -- Philosophy | Mass media -- Audiences | Visual perception | Digital media | Cinematography | PERFORMING ARTS / Film & Video / History & Criticism | Cinematography | Digital media | Mass media -- Audiences | Mass media -- Philosophy | Visual perceptionGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Postcinematic visionDDC classification: 302.23 LOC classification: P90 | .C6815 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Introduction -- Moving-Image Media and Embodied Spectatorship -- Media Convergence and Remediation -- 1 Film and the Embodied Mind -- Technogenesis: The Coevolution of the Biological and Technological -- The Phatic Image of Cinema-Reassessed -- "Consciousness Is an Epiphenomenon" -- Dual Temporalities of Media and the Mind -- Postcinematic Reflections on Spectatorship -- 2 1900: Film Transforms the Media Landscape -- Film as Prosthetic Visual Consciousness -- Mechanized Culture and the Moving Image
Remediation: The Convergence of Film and Writing -- Film and the Tyranny of Writing: Franz Kafka -- 3 2000: Cinema and the Digital Image -- Intermedial Constructions of Cinema's Virtual Reality -- Digital Mediations of Movement, Space, and Time -- Cinema and Singular Consciousness -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- Z
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P90 .C6815 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctvx5w8sw Available on1100427934

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Introduction -- Moving-Image Media and Embodied Spectatorship -- Media Convergence and Remediation -- 1 Film and the Embodied Mind -- Technogenesis: The Coevolution of the Biological and Technological -- The Phatic Image of Cinema-Reassessed -- "Consciousness Is an Epiphenomenon" -- Dual Temporalities of Media and the Mind -- Postcinematic Reflections on Spectatorship -- 2 1900: Film Transforms the Media Landscape -- Film as Prosthetic Visual Consciousness -- Mechanized Culture and the Moving Image

Remediation: The Convergence of Film and Writing -- Film and the Tyranny of Writing: Franz Kafka -- 3 2000: Cinema and the Digital Image -- Intermedial Constructions of Cinema's Virtual Reality -- Digital Mediations of Movement, Space, and Time -- Cinema and Singular Consciousness -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- Z

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 05, 2020).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In Post-Cinematic Vision, Cook (German studies and film studies, Univ. of Minnesota) uses cinema as a case study to make an argument for the coevolution of humans and their technologies. Whether he succeeds is another matter. In the introduction he makes a case for a strong model of coevolution, and the three chapters that follow point to a weaker model. The first chapter gives an excellent overview of the intersection of cognitive science and media studies. The second chapter looks at interpretations of cinema as a social agent in the early 20th century, with a lengthy sidelight into Franz Kafka's relation to cinema, and the third looks at the same issues at the end of the 20th century. The challenge with interpreting this book is that there are, effectively, four very different essays across the three chapters, each taking a different approach that is not solidly anchored back to the intent stated in the introduction. That said, it is an excellent book for provoking thought and discussion. Cook actively problematizes common media tropes, effectively argues that cinema is far more than a visual experience, and makes a solid contribution to the literature. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; professionals. --Peter Lawrence Kantor, Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Roger F. Cook is professor of German studies and director of the Film Studies Program at the University of Missouri. He has written extensively on film and media theory, New German Cinema, and contemporary German film. He coedited The Cinema of Wim Wenders: Image, Narrative, and the Postmodern Condition and is coeditor of Berlin School Glossary: An ABC of the New Wave in German Cinema .

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