The profits of nature : colonial development and the quest for resources in nineteenth-century China / Peter B. Lavelle.

By: Lavelle, Peter B [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231550956; 0231550952Subject(s): Zuo, Zongtang, 1812-1885 | Zuo, Zongtang, 1812-1885 | Economic development -- China -- History -- 19th century | Natural resources -- Government policy -- China | China -- Economic policy -- 19th century | China -- Politics and government -- 19th century | HISTORY / Asia / China | Economic development | Economic policy | Natural resources -- Government policy | Politics and government | China | 1800-1899Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The profits of natureDDC classification: 333.70951/09034 LOC classification: HC427.7 | .L38 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Agriculture in a Critical Age -- Geography in an Unbalanced Empire -- Reclaiming the Land -- Profitable Crops -- Water in a Fertile Frontier -- Spreading Sericulture.
Summary: "In the nineteenth century, the Qing empire experienced a period of profound turmoil caused by an unprecedented conjunction of natural disasters, internal rebellions, and foreign incursions. The imperial government responded to these calamities by introducing an array of new policies and institutions to bolster its power across its massive territories. In the process, Qing officials launched campaigns for natural resource development, seeking to take advantage of the unexploited lands, waters, and minerals of the empire's vast hinterlands and borderlands. In this book, Peter B. Lavelle uses the life and career of Chinese statesman Zuo Zongtang (1812-1885) as a lens to explore the environmental history of this era. Although known for his pacification campaigns against internal rebellions, Zuo was at the forefront of the nineteenth-century quest for natural resources. Influenced by his knowledge of nature, geography, and technology, he created government bureaus and oversaw projects to improve agriculture, sericulture, and other industries in regions across the empire. His work forged new patterns of colonial development in the empire's vast northwest, including Xinjiang, at a time when imperial rivals were scrambling for resources around the globe. Weaving a narrative across the span of Zuo's lifetime, The Profits of Nature offers a new approach to understanding the dynamic relationship between imperial crisis, natural resources, and colonial development during a critical juncture in Chinese history, between the high tide of imperial power in the eighteenth century and the challenges of modern state-building in the twentieth century."-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HC427.7 .L38 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/lave19470 Available on1108783227

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Agriculture in a Critical Age -- Geography in an Unbalanced Empire -- Reclaiming the Land -- Profitable Crops -- Water in a Fertile Frontier -- Spreading Sericulture.

"In the nineteenth century, the Qing empire experienced a period of profound turmoil caused by an unprecedented conjunction of natural disasters, internal rebellions, and foreign incursions. The imperial government responded to these calamities by introducing an array of new policies and institutions to bolster its power across its massive territories. In the process, Qing officials launched campaigns for natural resource development, seeking to take advantage of the unexploited lands, waters, and minerals of the empire's vast hinterlands and borderlands. In this book, Peter B. Lavelle uses the life and career of Chinese statesman Zuo Zongtang (1812-1885) as a lens to explore the environmental history of this era. Although known for his pacification campaigns against internal rebellions, Zuo was at the forefront of the nineteenth-century quest for natural resources. Influenced by his knowledge of nature, geography, and technology, he created government bureaus and oversaw projects to improve agriculture, sericulture, and other industries in regions across the empire. His work forged new patterns of colonial development in the empire's vast northwest, including Xinjiang, at a time when imperial rivals were scrambling for resources around the globe. Weaving a narrative across the span of Zuo's lifetime, The Profits of Nature offers a new approach to understanding the dynamic relationship between imperial crisis, natural resources, and colonial development during a critical juncture in Chinese history, between the high tide of imperial power in the eighteenth century and the challenges of modern state-building in the twentieth century."-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on February 28, 2020).

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Peter B. Lavelle is assistant professor of history at Temple University.

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