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Black feelings : race and affect in the long sixties / Lisa M. Corrigan.

By: Corrigan, Lisa M [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2020Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781496827999; 1496827996; 9781496827968; 1496827961; 9781496827975; 149682797X; 9781496827982; 1496827988.Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- History | Black power -- United States -- Psychological aspects | Emotions -- Social aspects | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies / African American Studies | African Americans -- Civil rights | Emotions -- Social aspects | United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Black feelingsDDC classification: 323.1196/073 LOC classification: E185.615Other classification: SOC001000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Racial feelings in black and white -- Postwar feelings: beyond hope -- Contouring black hope and despair -- American negritude: black rage and the restoration of pride -- Feeling riots: the emotional language of urban rebellion -- Mourning King: memory, affect, and the shaping of black power -- Revolutionary suicide: necromimesis, radical agency, and black ontology -- Conclusion: The Obama coalition: reinvigorating liberal hope -- Notes -- Index.
Summary: "In the 1969 issue of Negro Digest, a young Black Arts Movement poet then-named Ameer (Amiri) Baraka published "We Are Our Feeling: The Black Aesthetic." Baraka's emphasis on the importance of feelings in black selfhood expressed a touchstone for how the black liberation movement grappled with emotions in response to the politics and racial violence of the era. In her latest book, award-winning author Lisa M. Corrigan suggests that Black Power provided a significant repository for negative feelings, largely black pessimism, to resist the constant physical violence against black activists and the psychological strain of political disappointment. Corrigan asserts the emergence of Black Power as a discourse of black emotional invention in opposition to Kennedy-era white hope. As integration became the prevailing discourse of racial liberalism shaping mid-century discursive structures, so too, did racial feelings mold the biopolitical order of postmodern life in America. By examining the discourses produced by Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Huey Newton, Eldridge Cleaver, and other Black Power icons who were marshaling black feelings in the service of black political action, Corrigan traces how black liberation activists mobilized new emotional repertoires"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "How the black liberation movement confronted ideologies of progress and equality through emotional discourse"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E185.615 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvx5w9d1 Available on1125129897

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Racial feelings in black and white -- Postwar feelings: beyond hope -- Contouring black hope and despair -- American negritude: black rage and the restoration of pride -- Feeling riots: the emotional language of urban rebellion -- Mourning King: memory, affect, and the shaping of black power -- Revolutionary suicide: necromimesis, radical agency, and black ontology -- Conclusion: The Obama coalition: reinvigorating liberal hope -- Notes -- Index.

"In the 1969 issue of Negro Digest, a young Black Arts Movement poet then-named Ameer (Amiri) Baraka published "We Are Our Feeling: The Black Aesthetic." Baraka's emphasis on the importance of feelings in black selfhood expressed a touchstone for how the black liberation movement grappled with emotions in response to the politics and racial violence of the era. In her latest book, award-winning author Lisa M. Corrigan suggests that Black Power provided a significant repository for negative feelings, largely black pessimism, to resist the constant physical violence against black activists and the psychological strain of political disappointment. Corrigan asserts the emergence of Black Power as a discourse of black emotional invention in opposition to Kennedy-era white hope. As integration became the prevailing discourse of racial liberalism shaping mid-century discursive structures, so too, did racial feelings mold the biopolitical order of postmodern life in America. By examining the discourses produced by Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Huey Newton, Eldridge Cleaver, and other Black Power icons who were marshaling black feelings in the service of black political action, Corrigan traces how black liberation activists mobilized new emotional repertoires"-- Provided by publisher.

"How the black liberation movement confronted ideologies of progress and equality through emotional discourse"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lisa M. Corrigan is associate professor of communication, director of the gender studies program, and affiliate faculty in African and African American studies and in Latin American and Latino studies at the University of Arkansas. She is author of the award-winning Prison Power: How Prison Influenced the Movement for Black Liberation , published by University Press of Mississippi.

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