How the other half laughs : the comic sensibility in American culture, 1895-1920 / Jean Lee Cole.

By: Cole, Jean Lee [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (xi, 188 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781496826572; 1496826574; 9781496826541; 149682654X; 9781496826558; 1496826558; 9781496826565; 1496826566Subject(s): Comic, The -- Social aspects -- United States | Comic books, strips, etc. -- United States -- History and criticism | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Social aspects | United States -- Social conditions -- 19th century | LITERARY CRITICISM / Comics & Graphic Novels | Comic books, strips, etc | Emigration and immigration -- Social aspects | Social conditions | United States | 1800-1899Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc.Additional physical formats: Print version:: How the other half laughsDDC classification: 817/.509 LOC classification: PS228.C59 | C65 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction: The comic sensibility -- The comic grotesque -- Rising from the gutter -- Illustration and the narrative quality of appeal -- The black comic sensibility -- Coda -- Notes -- Works Consulted -- Index.
Summary: "Taking up the role of laughter in society, How the Other Half Laughs: The Comic Sensibility in American Culture, 1895-1920 examines an era in which the US population was becoming increasingly multiethnic and multiracial. Comic artists and writers, hoping to create works that would appeal to a diverse audience, had to formulate a method for making the "other half" laugh. In magazine fiction, vaudeville, and the comic strip, the oppressive conditions of the poor and the marginalized were portrayed unflinchingly, yet with a distinctly comic sensibility that grew out of caricature and ethnic humor. Author Jean Lee Cole analyzes Progressive Era popular culture, providing a critical angle to approach visual and literary humor about ethnicity-how avenues of comedy serve as expressions of solidarity, commiseration, and empowerment. Cole's argument centers on the comic sensibility, which she defines as a performative act that fosters feelings of solidarity and community among the marginalized. Cole stresses the connections between the worlds of art, journalism, and literature and the people who produced them-including George Herriman, R. F. Outcault, Rudolph Dirks, Jimmy Swinnerton, George Luks, and William Glackens-and traces the form's emergence in the pages of Joseph Pulitzer's New York World and William Randolph Hearst's Journal-American and how it influenced popular fiction, illustration, and art. How the Other Half Laughs restores the newspaper comic strip to its rightful place as a transformative element of American culture at the turn into the twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.
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PS228.C59 C65 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvx5w9mx Available on1133664079

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction: The comic sensibility -- The comic grotesque -- Rising from the gutter -- Illustration and the narrative quality of appeal -- The black comic sensibility -- Coda -- Notes -- Works Consulted -- Index.

"Taking up the role of laughter in society, How the Other Half Laughs: The Comic Sensibility in American Culture, 1895-1920 examines an era in which the US population was becoming increasingly multiethnic and multiracial. Comic artists and writers, hoping to create works that would appeal to a diverse audience, had to formulate a method for making the "other half" laugh. In magazine fiction, vaudeville, and the comic strip, the oppressive conditions of the poor and the marginalized were portrayed unflinchingly, yet with a distinctly comic sensibility that grew out of caricature and ethnic humor. Author Jean Lee Cole analyzes Progressive Era popular culture, providing a critical angle to approach visual and literary humor about ethnicity-how avenues of comedy serve as expressions of solidarity, commiseration, and empowerment. Cole's argument centers on the comic sensibility, which she defines as a performative act that fosters feelings of solidarity and community among the marginalized. Cole stresses the connections between the worlds of art, journalism, and literature and the people who produced them-including George Herriman, R. F. Outcault, Rudolph Dirks, Jimmy Swinnerton, George Luks, and William Glackens-and traces the form's emergence in the pages of Joseph Pulitzer's New York World and William Randolph Hearst's Journal-American and how it influenced popular fiction, illustration, and art. How the Other Half Laughs restores the newspaper comic strip to its rightful place as a transformative element of American culture at the turn into the twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on January 09, 2020).

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jean Lee Cole is professor of English at Loyola University Maryland. She is author of The Literary Voices of Winnifred Eaton: Redefining Ethnicity and Authenticity ; editor of Freedom's Witness: The Civil War Correspondence of Henry McNeal Turner ; and coeditor of Zora Neale Hurston: Collected Plays . She is editor of the scholarly journal American Periodicals and a former president of the Research Society for American Periodicals.

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