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Time for childhoods : young poets and questions of agency / Rachel Conrad.

By: Conrad, Rachel [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Childhoods: interdisciplinary perspectives on children and youth: Publisher: Amherst : University of Massachusetts Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (xv, 209 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781613766927; 1613766920.Other title: Young poets and questions of agency.Subject(s): Children's poetry, American -- History and criticism | Children -- United States -- Intellectual life | Child authors -- United States | American poetry -- 20th century -- History and criticism | American poetry -- 21st century -- History and criticism | American poetry | Child authors | Children -- Intellectual life | Children's poetry, American | United States | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Children's StudiesGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Time for childhoods.DDC classification: 811/.9099282 LOC classification: PS310.C5 | C66 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
"The Busy Clock" : Poetry and the Time of Youth -- "To bloom in its own time": Gwendolyn Brooks and the Poetic Vision of Very Young Poets -- "My future doesn't know / ME": Young Poets and Dynamic Temporality in Salting the Ocean: 100 Poems by Young Poets -- "My sole desire is to move someone through poetry, and allow for my voice to be heard": Young Poets, Children's Rights, and the Rattle Young Poets Anthology -- "We Speak to be Heard": June Jordan, Terri Bush, and The Voice of the Children -- Conclusion: "Poems are voiceprints of language".
Summary: "Poems written by children are not typically part of the literary canon. Because of cultural biases that frame young people as intellectually and artistically immature, these works are often excluded or dismissed as juvenilia. Rachel Conrad contends that youth-composed poems should be read as literary works in their own right--works that are deserving of greater respect in literary culture. Time for Childhoods presents a selection of striking twentieth- and twenty-first-century American poetry written by young people, and highlights how young poets imagined and shaped time for their own poetic purposes. Through close engagement with archival materials, as well as select interviews and correspondence with adult mentors, Conrad discerns how young writers figured social realities and political and racial injustices, and discusses what important advocates such as Gwendolyn Brooks and June Jordan can teach us about supporting the agency of young poets. This essential study demonstrates that young poets have much to contribute to ongoing conversations about time and power"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS310.C5 C66 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvxkn6z2 Available on1141859237

Includes bibliographical references (pages 183-201) and index.

"Poems written by children are not typically part of the literary canon. Because of cultural biases that frame young people as intellectually and artistically immature, these works are often excluded or dismissed as juvenilia. Rachel Conrad contends that youth-composed poems should be read as literary works in their own right--works that are deserving of greater respect in literary culture. Time for Childhoods presents a selection of striking twentieth- and twenty-first-century American poetry written by young people, and highlights how young poets imagined and shaped time for their own poetic purposes. Through close engagement with archival materials, as well as select interviews and correspondence with adult mentors, Conrad discerns how young writers figured social realities and political and racial injustices, and discusses what important advocates such as Gwendolyn Brooks and June Jordan can teach us about supporting the agency of young poets. This essential study demonstrates that young poets have much to contribute to ongoing conversations about time and power"-- Provided by publisher.

"The Busy Clock" : Poetry and the Time of Youth -- "To bloom in its own time": Gwendolyn Brooks and the Poetic Vision of Very Young Poets -- "My future doesn't know / ME": Young Poets and Dynamic Temporality in Salting the Ocean: 100 Poems by Young Poets -- "My sole desire is to move someone through poetry, and allow for my voice to be heard": Young Poets, Children's Rights, and the Rattle Young Poets Anthology -- "We Speak to be Heard": June Jordan, Terri Bush, and The Voice of the Children -- Conclusion: "Poems are voiceprints of language".

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