The female complaint : the unfinished business of sentimentality in American culture / Lauren Berlant.

By: Berlant, Lauren Gail, 1957- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Duke backfilePublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 353 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822389163; 0822389169; 1283022826; 9781283022828; 9786613022820; 6613022829Subject(s): Sentimentalism | Sentimentalism in literature | Sentimentalism in motion pictures | Mass media and women | Women -- Psychology | Emotions | Women in literature | Women in motion pictures | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Feminism & Feminist Theory | Emotions | Mass media and women | Sentimentalism | Sentimentalism in literature | Sentimentalism in motion pictures | Women in literature | Women in motion pictures | Women -- Psychology | Vrouwen | Sentimentalisme | Cultuurindustrie | Kulturtheorie | Massenkultur | Frau | USA | Kvinnor och massmedia | Kvinnor i litteraturen | Sentimentalitet | Kvinnorollen | LITERARY CRITICISM / Semiotics & TheoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Femaile complaint.DDC classification: 305.420973 LOC classification: BH301.E45 | B47 2008Other classification: 71.33 | HR 1704 | HR 1645 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface -- Introduction: intimacy, publicity, and femininity -- Poor Eliza -- Pax americana : the case of Show Boat -- National brands, national body : imitation of life -- Uncle Sam needs a wife : citizenship and denegation -- Remembering love, forgetting everything else : now, Voyager -- "It's not the tragedies that kill us, it's the messes" : femininity, formalism, and Dorothy Parker -- The compulsion to repeat femininity : landscape for a good woman and the life and loves of a she-devil.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: The Female Complaint is part of Lauren Berlant's groundbreaking "national sentimentality" project charting the emergence of the U.S. political sphere as an affective space of attachment and identification. In this book, Berlant chronicles the origins and conventions of the first mass-cultural "intimate public" in the United States, a "women's culture" distinguished by a view that women inevitably have something in common and are in need of a conversation that feels intimate and revelatory. As Berlant explains, "women's" books, films, and television shows enact a fantasy that a woman's life is not just her own, but an experience understood by other women, no matter how dissimilar they are. The commodified genres of intimacy, such as "chick lit," circulate among strangers, enabling insider self-help talk to flourish in an intimate public. Sentimentality and complaint are central to this commercial convention of critique; their relation to the political realm is ambivalent, as politics seems both to threaten sentimental values and to provide certain opportunities for their extension.
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BH301.E45 B47 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv1131c7k Available ocn223445460

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Preface -- Introduction: intimacy, publicity, and femininity -- Poor Eliza -- Pax americana : the case of Show Boat -- National brands, national body : imitation of life -- Uncle Sam needs a wife : citizenship and denegation -- Remembering love, forgetting everything else : now, Voyager -- "It's not the tragedies that kill us, it's the messes" : femininity, formalism, and Dorothy Parker -- The compulsion to repeat femininity : landscape for a good woman and the life and loves of a she-devil.

Print version record.

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The Female Complaint is part of Lauren Berlant's groundbreaking "national sentimentality" project charting the emergence of the U.S. political sphere as an affective space of attachment and identification. In this book, Berlant chronicles the origins and conventions of the first mass-cultural "intimate public" in the United States, a "women's culture" distinguished by a view that women inevitably have something in common and are in need of a conversation that feels intimate and revelatory. As Berlant explains, "women's" books, films, and television shows enact a fantasy that a woman's life is not just her own, but an experience understood by other women, no matter how dissimilar they are. The commodified genres of intimacy, such as "chick lit," circulate among strangers, enabling insider self-help talk to flourish in an intimate public. Sentimentality and complaint are central to this commercial convention of critique; their relation to the political realm is ambivalent, as politics seems both to threaten sentimental values and to provide certain opportunities for their extension.

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2011 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

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English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Unfortunately, this book's title emphasizes the static stereotypical role of women in popular culture. It is a misnomer and creates a disconnect with the book's content, which combines "literary criticism and historical analysis" (the book's classification as aesthetics notwithstanding). Berlant (English, Univ. of Chicago) is transparent about taking a different approach in emphasizing the denigration of women as a subculture. She presents examples of characters in novels and also in films, drama, and mass-mediated popular culture, but her verbosity and complex explanations confuse rather than clarify. Those looking for careful interpretations of gender myths have plenty to choose from--for example, in Masculinity in Crisis (CH, Apr'95, 32-4772) and Male Myths and Icons (CH, Apr'96, 33-4817), Roger Horrocks provides useful insights using cross-cultural anthropology, sociology, political science, and psychological theories. Those interested in Berlant's thesis may wish to pursue the leads offered in her notes and extensive bibliography. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students and researchers. G. M. Greenberg emerita, Western Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lauren Berlant is the George M. Pullman Professor of English and Chair of the Lesbian and Gay Studies Project at the University of Chicago. She is the author of The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship , also published by Duke University Press, and The Anatomy of National Fantasy: Hawthorne, Utopia, and Everyday Life . She is the editor of Compassion ; Our Monica, Ourselves: The Clinton Affair and the National Interest (with Lisa Duggan); and Intimacy .

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