Jungle laboratories : Mexican peasants, national projects, and the making of the Pill / Gabriela Soto Laveaga.

By: Soto Laveaga, Gabriela, 1971-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham [NC] : Duke University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 331 pages) : mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822391968; 0822391961; 9786613036346; 661303634XSubject(s): Proquivemex | Proquivemex | Proquivemex | Pharmaceutical industry -- Social aspects -- Mexico | Barbasco (Dioscorea mexicana) | Drug Industry -- history | Paullinia | Dioscorea | Diosgenin | Socioeconomic Factors | Mexico | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Industries -- Service | Barbasco (Dioscorea mexicana) | Pharmaceutical industry -- Social aspects | Mexico | Steroidhormon | Pharmazeutische Technologie | Dioscorea mexicana | Heilpflanzenanbau | Mexiko | HISTORY / Latin America / MexicoGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Jungle laboratories.DDC classification: 338.47615324 LOC classification: HD9670.M62 | S68 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Papaloapan, poverty, and a wild yam -- Mexican peasants, a foreign chemist, and the Mexican father of the Pill -- Discovering and gathering the new "green gold" -- Patents, compounds, and steroid-making peasants -- A yam, students, and a populist project -- The state takes control of barbasco : the emergence of Proquivemex (1974/1976) -- Proquivemex and transnational steroid laboratories -- Barbasqueros into Mexicans -- Root of discord.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: Shows how wild yams, once considered useless, briefly became indispensable to the global pharmaceutical industry (as a source of synthetic steroid hormones) and to the peasants who gathered them.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD9670.M62 S68 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv1131324 Available ocn504585036

Includes bibliographical references (pages 287-317) and index.

The Papaloapan, poverty, and a wild yam -- Mexican peasants, a foreign chemist, and the Mexican father of the Pill -- Discovering and gathering the new "green gold" -- Patents, compounds, and steroid-making peasants -- A yam, students, and a populist project -- The state takes control of barbasco : the emergence of Proquivemex (1974/1976) -- Proquivemex and transnational steroid laboratories -- Barbasqueros into Mexicans -- Root of discord.

Print version record.

Shows how wild yams, once considered useless, briefly became indispensable to the global pharmaceutical industry (as a source of synthetic steroid hormones) and to the peasants who gathered them.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2011 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The birth control pill began as large, unlovely roots in the rain forests of southern Mexico. Russell Marker discovered it was rich in steroids, and Luis Ernesto Miramontes found these included compounds that could be made into fertility-regulating hormones. The contraceptive pill was soon developed. Historian Soto Laveaga (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara) focuses not so much on the pill as on the roots: tubers of certain species of wild yam (Dioscorea). These quickly became extremely valuable and caused a boom, briefly providing a decent living for local indigenous people (inaccurately termed "peasants" in this book) as well as urban chemists. Local people organized, the government got involved at high levels, and political problems developed. Other sources of steroids were found, and eventually synthetic ones took over, ending the boom. Recriminations still fly; Mexico accuses foreign firms of taking over a Mexican heritage, others say that Mexican politicians mismanaged the situation. This book tells the political story, but is probably not the last word. Valuable for anyone interested in economic botany or the history of contraceptives and steroids; useful for historians of modern Mexico. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. N. Anderson emeritus, University of California, Riverside

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gabriela Soto Laveaga is Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.