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Consuming Mexican labor : from the Bracero Program to NAFTA / Ronald L. Mize and Alicia C.S. Swords.

By: Mize, Ronald L, 1970- [author.].
Contributor(s): Swords, Alicia C. S, 1974- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781442601598; 1442601590; 9781442604094; 1442604093.Other title: From the Bracero Program to NAFTA.Subject(s): Foreign workers, Mexican -- United States | Mexicans -- Employment -- United States | Mexicans -- United States -- Social conditions | Mexicans -- Civil rights -- United States | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy | Mexico -- Emigration and immigration | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Labor | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Labor & Industrial Relations | Emigration and immigration | Emigration and immigration -- Government policy | Foreign workers, Mexican | Mexicans -- Civil rights | Mexicans -- Employment | Mexicans -- Social conditions | Mexico | United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.DDC classification: 331.6/272073 LOC classification: E184.M5 | M59 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Part I: Establishing connections -- 1. The Bracero Program, 1942-1964 -- 2. Operation wetback, 1954 -- Part II: Mounting resistance -- 3. Farmworker Civil Rights Movement / El Movimiento Campesino -- 4. Organized labor and Mexican Labor Organization -- 5. Backlash and retrenchment (1980s-1990s) -- Part III: Regions -- 6. Mexican labor in Aztlán -- 7. Mexican labor in the heartland -- 8. Mexican labor in the hinterlands -- 9. Mexican labor en la Frontera -- 10. Mexican labor in Mexico: the impact of NAFTA from Chiapas to Turismo -- 11. Mexican labor in Canada: from temporary workers to precarious labor.
Summary: "Mexican migration to the United States and Canada is a highly contentious issue in the eyes of many North Americans, and every generation seems to construct the northward flow of labor as a brand new social problem. The history of Mexican labor migration to the United States, from the Bracero Program (1942-1964) to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), suggests that Mexicans have been actively encouraged to migrate northward when labor markets are in short supply, only to be turned back during economic downturns. In this timely book, Mize and Swords dissect the social relations that define how corporations, consumers, and states involve Mexican immigrant laborers in the politics of production and consumption. The result is a comprehensive and contemporary look at the increasingly important role that Mexican immigrants play in the North American economy."--Pub. desc.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E184.M5 M59 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3138/j.ctt2ttpgc Available ocn659174294
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E184.M5 M378 2013 Chicano Psychology. E184.M5 M387 2005 PADRES : E184.M5 M46 2001 Recovering history, constructing race : E184.M5 M59 2010 Consuming Mexican labor : E184.M5 M655 2013 How Race Is Made in America : E184.M5 O58 2013 In the spirit of a new people : E184.M5 O775 2009 No Mexicans, women, or dogs allowed :

Part I: Establishing connections -- 1. The Bracero Program, 1942-1964 -- 2. Operation wetback, 1954 -- Part II: Mounting resistance -- 3. Farmworker Civil Rights Movement / El Movimiento Campesino -- 4. Organized labor and Mexican Labor Organization -- 5. Backlash and retrenchment (1980s-1990s) -- Part III: Regions -- 6. Mexican labor in Aztlán -- 7. Mexican labor in the heartland -- 8. Mexican labor in the hinterlands -- 9. Mexican labor en la Frontera -- 10. Mexican labor in Mexico: the impact of NAFTA from Chiapas to Turismo -- 11. Mexican labor in Canada: from temporary workers to precarious labor.

"Mexican migration to the United States and Canada is a highly contentious issue in the eyes of many North Americans, and every generation seems to construct the northward flow of labor as a brand new social problem. The history of Mexican labor migration to the United States, from the Bracero Program (1942-1964) to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), suggests that Mexicans have been actively encouraged to migrate northward when labor markets are in short supply, only to be turned back during economic downturns. In this timely book, Mize and Swords dissect the social relations that define how corporations, consumers, and states involve Mexican immigrant laborers in the politics of production and consumption. The result is a comprehensive and contemporary look at the increasingly important role that Mexican immigrants play in the North American economy."--Pub. desc.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 253-272) and index.

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