Latinamericanism after 9/11 / John Beverley.

By: Beverley, John, 1943-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPost-contemporary interventions: Publisher: Durham [NC] : Duke University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (166 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822394686; 0822394685; 1283293048; 9781283293044; 9786613293046; 6613293040Subject(s): Latin America -- Study and teaching (Higher) | Latin America -- History -- 1980- | Latin America -- Politics and government -- 1980- | HISTORY -- Latin America -- General | HISTORY -- Latin America -- South America | Politics and government | Latin America | Kulturtheorie | Lateinamerika | Kulturstudier -- Latinamerika | Latinamerika -- studier och undervisning -- högskolan | Latinamerika -- politik och förvaltning | Regions & Countries - Americas | History & Archaeology | Latin America | Regions & Countries - Asia & the Middle East | Earth & Environmental Sciences | Environmental Sciences | South Asia | LITERARY CRITICISM / Semiotics & Theory | Since 1980Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Latinamericanism after 9/11.DDC classification: 980.04072 LOC classification: F1409.9 | .B48 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Latinamericanism after 9/11 -- The persistence of the nation (against empire) -- Deconstruction and Latinamericanism (apropos Alberto Moreiras's the Exhaustion of difference) -- Between Ariel and Caliban : on the politics of location of Latinamericanism and the question of solidarity -- The neoconservative turn -- Beyond the paradigm of disillusion : rethinking the armed struggle in Latin America -- The subaltern and the state.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: Argues that post-9/11 is a new period for Latin America that portends increasing confrontation with North America and hence requires a new form of Latin Americanism capable of confronting U.S. hegemony and expressing an alternative future for Latin Americ.
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F1409.9 .B48 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11318h8 Available ocn757543019

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Latinamericanism after 9/11 -- The persistence of the nation (against empire) -- Deconstruction and Latinamericanism (apropos Alberto Moreiras's the Exhaustion of difference) -- Between Ariel and Caliban : on the politics of location of Latinamericanism and the question of solidarity -- The neoconservative turn -- Beyond the paradigm of disillusion : rethinking the armed struggle in Latin America -- The subaltern and the state.

Print version record.

Argues that post-9/11 is a new period for Latin America that portends increasing confrontation with North America and hence requires a new form of Latin Americanism capable of confronting U.S. hegemony and expressing an alternative future for Latin Americ.

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English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Beverley (Hispanic languages and literature, Univ. of Pittsburgh) explores the roots and applications of the term "Latinamericanism," concluding that Latinamericanism is ultimately tied to the Latin American state. He traces deconstruction's role in the failure of the region's first armed struggles and characterizes the experience of its participants as disillusioned. Acknowledging the presence of the new Left in Latin America as an outgrowth of the previous contradictions, he notes that the emergence of the marea rosada ("Pink Tide") followed the US shift in attention from Latin America after 9/11. Beverley anticipates either neoconservative or ultra-leftist poles, both poised to replace globalization and neoliberal hegemony, as the next turn in the political sphere. Following Garcia Linera's response that the "general horizon of the era" is communism, he sees the need for a people-state to come from the subaltern classes, and affirms the role of the critical intellectual in the process of creating solidarity and reinventing the state as such. Conversant across the disciplines (sociology, history, economics, politics, literary criticism) with worldwide theorists and familiar with a "studies" approach, Beverley produces a book of ambitious scope with a striking conclusion that the reader, though disinclined to accept, is hard-pressed to ignore. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. J. M. Beatson Charleston Southern University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John Beverley is Distinguished Professor of Hispanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the author of Subalternity and Representation: Arguments in Cultural Theory and co-editor of The Postmodernism Debate in Latin America , both also published by Duke University Press.

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