Statistical panic : cultural politics and poetics of the emotions / Kathleen Woodward.

By: Woodward, Kathleen MMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham [NC] : Duke University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (xii, 316 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822392316; 0822392313; 128306538X; 9781283065382; 9786613065384; 6613065382Subject(s): Emotions -- Social aspects | United States -- Social conditions -- 1945- | United States -- Civilization -- 1945- | Emotions in literature | FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS -- Death, Grief, Bereavement | PSYCHOLOGY -- Emotions | Civilization | Emotions in literature | Emotions -- Social aspects | Social conditions | United States | Emoties | Sociale aspecten | Massamedia | Gefühl | Kultur | Politik | LITERARY CRITICISM / Feminist | Since 1945Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Statistical panic.DDC classification: 152.4 LOC classification: BF531 | .W66 2009Other classification: 77.46 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: thinking feeling, feeling thinking -- Containing anger, advocating anger: Freud and feminism -- Against wisdom: anger and aging -- Racial shame, mass-mediated shame, mutual shame -- Liberal compassion, compassionate conservatism -- Sympathy for nonhuman cyborgs -- Bureaucratic rage -- Statistical panic -- Coda: inexhaustible grief.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveReview: "In this moving and thoughtful book, Kathleen Woodward explores the politics and poetics of the emotions, focusing on American culture since the 1960s. She argues that we are constrained in terms of gender, race, and age by our culture's scripts for "emotional" behavior and that the accelerating impoverishment of interiority is a symptom of our increasingly media-saturated culture. She also shows how we can be empowered by stories that express our experience, revealing the value of our emotions as a crucial form of intelligence." "Referring discreetly to her own experience, Woodward examines the interpenetration of social structures and subjectivity, considering how psychological emotions are social phenomena, with feminist anger, racial shame, old-age depression, and sympathy for non-human cyborgs (including robots) as key cases in point. She discusses how emerging institutional and discursive structures engender "new" affects that in turn can help us understand our changing world if we are attentive to them - the "statistical panic" produced by the risk society, with its numerical portents of disease and mortality; the rage prompted by impenetrable and bloated bureaucracies; the brutal shame experienced by those caught in the crossfire of the media; and the conservative compassion that is not an emotion at all, only an empty political slogan."--Jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BF531 .W66 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11cw932 Available ocn762877644

Includes bibliographical references (pages 275-295) and index.

Introduction: thinking feeling, feeling thinking -- Containing anger, advocating anger: Freud and feminism -- Against wisdom: anger and aging -- Racial shame, mass-mediated shame, mutual shame -- Liberal compassion, compassionate conservatism -- Sympathy for nonhuman cyborgs -- Bureaucratic rage -- Statistical panic -- Coda: inexhaustible grief.

"In this moving and thoughtful book, Kathleen Woodward explores the politics and poetics of the emotions, focusing on American culture since the 1960s. She argues that we are constrained in terms of gender, race, and age by our culture's scripts for "emotional" behavior and that the accelerating impoverishment of interiority is a symptom of our increasingly media-saturated culture. She also shows how we can be empowered by stories that express our experience, revealing the value of our emotions as a crucial form of intelligence." "Referring discreetly to her own experience, Woodward examines the interpenetration of social structures and subjectivity, considering how psychological emotions are social phenomena, with feminist anger, racial shame, old-age depression, and sympathy for non-human cyborgs (including robots) as key cases in point. She discusses how emerging institutional and discursive structures engender "new" affects that in turn can help us understand our changing world if we are attentive to them - the "statistical panic" produced by the risk society, with its numerical portents of disease and mortality; the rage prompted by impenetrable and bloated bureaucracies; the brutal shame experienced by those caught in the crossfire of the media; and the conservative compassion that is not an emotion at all, only an empty political slogan."--Jacket.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2011 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Print version record.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

If this reviewer were to recommend one current book to those in the emotion-science community, it would be this marvelous, wise collection of essays. Although nominally a work of literary and cultural criticism, the volume provides those interested in emotion in any discipline with a fresh exploration of the intersection of culture, emotions, and technology. Also the author of Aging and Its Discontents (CH, Jul'91, 28-6510) and Figuring Age (1999), Woodward (English, Univ. of Washington) examines this intersection from many angles, from the cultural politics of emotions as they intertwine with gender, age, and race to the implications of the dissolving boundaries between humans and their cybernetic artifacts. To say that this is a book about emotions, however, does not do justice to the breadth and depth of Woodward's interests. As her essay on cyborgs evidences, one of the author's central concerns is what it means to have emotions--i.e., what it means to be human. A deeply humane, gracefully written work of keen intelligence, this book is a critical resource for those interested in understanding emotions as represented in literature and as lived in daily life and in investigating what emotions reveal about human nature. Summing Up: Essential. All readers. R. R. Cornelius Vassar College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kathleen Woodward is Professor of English at the University of Washington, where she directs the Simpson Center for the Humanities. She is the author of Aging and Its Discontents: Freud and Other Fictions and the editor of Figuring Age: Women, Bodies, Generations and The Myths of Information: Technology and Postindustrial Culture .

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.