The Oriental obscene : violence and racial fantasies in the Vietnam era / Sylvia Shin Huey Chong.

By: Chong, Sylvia Shin Huey, 1975-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 364 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822393405; 0822393409; 1283333902; 9781283333900; 9786613333902; 6613333905Subject(s): Bibel Philemonbrief | Umschulungswerkstätten für Siedler und Auswanderer Bitterfeld | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Motion pictures and the war | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Television and the war | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- United States | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Violence -- United States -- History -- 20th century | ART -- Film & Video | PERFORMING ARTS -- Film & Video -- Reference | Race relations | Violence | War and motion pictures | War and television | United States | Fernsehsendung | Nachrichtensendung | Fotografie | Vietnamkrieg Motiv | PERFORMING ARTS / Film & Video / History & Criticism | Vietnam War (1961-1975) | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Oriental obscene.DDC classification: 791.43/658597043 LOC classification: DS557.73 | .C46 2012Other classification: AP 49400 | AP 50300 K9 | 8 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : specters of Vietnam -- Bringing the war home : spectacles of violence and rebellion in the American 1968 -- Reporting the war : ethical crises of action in the movement-image of Vietnam -- Restaging the war : fantasizing defeat in Hollywood's Vietnam -- Kung Fu fighting : pacifying and mastering the martial body -- Being Bruce Lee : death and the limits of the movement-image of martial arts -- Conclusion : returning to 'Nam : the Vietnam veteran's orientalized body.
Summary: This book explores the impact of media representations of violence during the Vietnam War on people in the U.S.-specifically how images of violence done to and by the Vietnamese were traumatic in ways that deeply affected the American psyche.
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DS557.73 .C46 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11318wz Available ocn766004354

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction : specters of Vietnam -- Bringing the war home : spectacles of violence and rebellion in the American 1968 -- Reporting the war : ethical crises of action in the movement-image of Vietnam -- Restaging the war : fantasizing defeat in Hollywood's Vietnam -- Kung Fu fighting : pacifying and mastering the martial body -- Being Bruce Lee : death and the limits of the movement-image of martial arts -- Conclusion : returning to 'Nam : the Vietnam veteran's orientalized body.

Print version record.

This book explores the impact of media representations of violence during the Vietnam War on people in the U.S.-specifically how images of violence done to and by the Vietnamese were traumatic in ways that deeply affected the American psyche.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Chong (film and Asian American studies, Univ. of Virginia) explores the portrayal of Asians in Western media in the context of the Vietnam War and its impact on the racialization of Asian bodies. She examines the "othering" of the Vietnamese during the war, allowing for objectifying and displaying of their bodies in ways unthinkable for white bodies. Her analysis readily aligns with current portrayals of Middle Eastern peoples and cultures, and lays the groundwork for further exploration of Western media's long-range impact on the treatment of those in the Far East and Middle East by Western politicians and societies. Chong's brilliantly written text also traces the steps leading to the creation of the Bruce Lee mystique and myth, culminating in an African American martial arts movement in the 1970s. In addition, she illustrates the symbiotic relationship between the Asian American and African American experience of the 1960s and 1970s, and the impact of the civil rights movement on activism in the Asian American community. Chong's enlightening, comprehensive study serves as an excellent addition to Asian American and media studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. A. F. Winstead Our Lady of the Lake University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sylvia Shin Huey Chong is Associate Professor of Film and Asian American Studies in the English Department and the Program in American Studies at the University of Virginia.

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