A different light : the photography of Sebastião Salgado / Parvati Nair.

By: Nair, ParvatiMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham [N.C.] : Duke University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (x, 365 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822394372; 0822394375; 1283354160; 9781283354165Subject(s): Salgado, Sebastião, 1944- -- Criticism and interpretation | Salgado, Sebastião, 1944- | COMPUTERS -- Digital Media -- Photography | PHOTOGRAPHY -- Reference | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING -- Imaging Systems | PHOTOGRAPHY / Individual Photographers / GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Different light.DDC classification: 770 LOC classification: TR140.S35 | N35 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: photo-trajectory -- The moving lens: abiding concerns and photographic projects -- Photography in late modernity: between the aesthetic and the documentary -- Eye witness: on photography and historiography -- Just regard: on photography, aesthetics, and ethics -- The practice of photography: toward a polity of the planet.
Summary: "A Different Light is the first in-depth study of the work of Sebastião Salgado, widely considered the greatest documentary photographer of our time. For more than three decades, Salgado has produced thematic photo-essays depicting the massive human displacement brought about by industrialization and conflict. These projects usually take years to complete and include pictures from dozens of countries. Parvati Nair offers detailed analyses of Salgado's best-known photo-essays, including Workers (1993) and Migrations (2000), as well as Genesis, which he began in 2004. With Genesis, Salgado has turned his lens from human turmoil to those parts of the planet not yet ravaged by modernity. Interpreting the photographer's oeuvre, Nair engages broad questions about aesthetics, history, ethics, and politics in documentary photography. At the same time, she draws on conversations with Salgado and his wife and partner, Lélia Wanick Salgado, to explain the significance of the photographer's life history, including his roots in Brazil and his training as an economist; his perspectives; and his artistic method. Underpinning all of Salgado's major projects is a concern with displacement, exploitation, and destruction--of people, communities, and land. Salgado's images exalt reality, compelling viewers to look and, according to Nair, to envision the world otherwise."--Publisher's website.
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TR140.S35 N35 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv113151k Available ocn773476364

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: photo-trajectory -- The moving lens: abiding concerns and photographic projects -- Photography in late modernity: between the aesthetic and the documentary -- Eye witness: on photography and historiography -- Just regard: on photography, aesthetics, and ethics -- The practice of photography: toward a polity of the planet.

"A Different Light is the first in-depth study of the work of Sebastião Salgado, widely considered the greatest documentary photographer of our time. For more than three decades, Salgado has produced thematic photo-essays depicting the massive human displacement brought about by industrialization and conflict. These projects usually take years to complete and include pictures from dozens of countries. Parvati Nair offers detailed analyses of Salgado's best-known photo-essays, including Workers (1993) and Migrations (2000), as well as Genesis, which he began in 2004. With Genesis, Salgado has turned his lens from human turmoil to those parts of the planet not yet ravaged by modernity. Interpreting the photographer's oeuvre, Nair engages broad questions about aesthetics, history, ethics, and politics in documentary photography. At the same time, she draws on conversations with Salgado and his wife and partner, Lélia Wanick Salgado, to explain the significance of the photographer's life history, including his roots in Brazil and his training as an economist; his perspectives; and his artistic method. Underpinning all of Salgado's major projects is a concern with displacement, exploitation, and destruction--of people, communities, and land. Salgado's images exalt reality, compelling viewers to look and, according to Nair, to envision the world otherwise."--Publisher's website.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

As one of the world's most respected documentarians, Brazilian photographer Sebastiao Salgado has focused his camera for more than 30 years on the human condition worldwide. He has documented such powerful subjects as laborers (Workers), mass displacement (Migrations), child refugees (The Children), and the drought in northern Africa (Afrika). Nair (director, Ctr. for the Study of Migration, Queen Mary, Univ. of London) here presents the first comprehensive look at the important and influential photo-essays of Salgado, an artist who uniquely infuses even the most desperate subject matter with both beauty and sensitivity. Through exhaustive research on Salgado's work, Nair raises critical questions on ethics, politics, history, photography, and aesthetics. Having published ten major books of photographs, Salgado is also the winner of numerous international photography awards; he actively participates with international charities, including UNICEF and the World Health Organization. Particularly poignant are the intimate conversations among Nair, Salgado, and his wife, Lelia, which add tremendous clarity to Salgado's worldview. -VERDICT Highly recommended for fans of Salgado's work and for those interested in photo-journalism, documentary photography, and global humanitarian issues.-Shauna Frischkorn, Millersville Univ., PA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This thought-provoking treatise by Nair (Univ. of London) on the ever-relevant question of beauty in social commentary art centers on Salgado's photography--the best choice for an ethics versus economics debate. (Do aesthetic concerns deflate or enrich the social message?) Nair's exploration (the first in-depth study of Salgado) is superb but a bit dense with repetition. It suffers from being limited to 20 reproductions (readers should consult Salgado's books for a thorough understanding of the central issue). Also desirable would be more contributions by Salgado's wife, Lelia, discussion of the use/non-use of text (with examples) in Salgado's books and exhibitions, more interrogation of Salgado's images, and information on contributions by assistants. One senses a struggle between the focus on biographical versus philosophical issues. Nonetheless, this treatise is useful for its focus on Salgado and its contribution to the search for answers about the ongoing presence of what often seems an unsolvable but significant concern. Nair's book highlights another central core within Salgado's ongoing visual investigation: the varying relationship(s) between humans and the land. Much other pertinent literature exists but is not included in the otherwise useful endnotes/bibliography. Readers should also examine Scott Walden's edited Photography and Philosophy (CH, Nov'08, 46-1304). Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. C. Chiarenza emeritus, University of Rochester

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