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Making cinelandia : American films and Mexican film culture before the Golden Age / Laura Isabel Serna.

By: Serna, Laura Isabel, 1971- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Durham ; London : Duke University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 317 pages) : illustrations, maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822376798; 0822376792.Subject(s): Motion pictures, Mexican -- History -- 20th century | National characteristics, Mexican, in motion pictures | Motion pictures -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century | Motion pictures, American -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century | PERFORMING ARTS -- Reference | Motion pictures | Motion pictures, American | Motion pictures, Mexican | National characteristics, Mexican, in motion pictures | Mexico | PERFORMING ARTS / Film & Video / History & Criticism | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Making cinelandia.DDC classification: 791.430972 LOC classification: PN1993.5.M6 | S47 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Yanqui invasion -- U.S. motion picture companies go South of the border -- American movies, Mexican modernity: the cinema as a national space -- In Lola's house: fan discourse in the making of Mexican film culture -- Border crossings -- La virgen and La Pelona: film culture, border crossing, and the modern Mexican woman -- Denigrating pictures: censorship and the politics of U.S. film in greater Mexico -- Al cine: Mexican migrants go to the movies.
Summary: In the 1920s, as American films came to dominate the country's cinemas, many of Mexico's cultural and political elites feared that this "Yanqui Invasion" would turn Mexico into a cultural vassal of the United States. In Making Cinelandia, Laura Isabel Serna contends that Hollywood films were not simply tools of cultural imperialism. Instead, they offered Mexicans on both sides of the border an imaginative and crucial means of participating in global modernity, even as these films and their producers and distributors frequently displayed anti-Mexican bias. Before the "Golden Age."
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1993.5.M6 S47 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv1131df5 Available ocn869577943

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Yanqui invasion -- U.S. motion picture companies go South of the border -- American movies, Mexican modernity: the cinema as a national space -- In Lola's house: fan discourse in the making of Mexican film culture -- Border crossings -- La virgen and La Pelona: film culture, border crossing, and the modern Mexican woman -- Denigrating pictures: censorship and the politics of U.S. film in greater Mexico -- Al cine: Mexican migrants go to the movies.

Print version record.

In the 1920s, as American films came to dominate the country's cinemas, many of Mexico's cultural and political elites feared that this "Yanqui Invasion" would turn Mexico into a cultural vassal of the United States. In Making Cinelandia, Laura Isabel Serna contends that Hollywood films were not simply tools of cultural imperialism. Instead, they offered Mexicans on both sides of the border an imaginative and crucial means of participating in global modernity, even as these films and their producers and distributors frequently displayed anti-Mexican bias. Before the "Golden Age."

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Because it deals with Mexican film culture from the teens to the early 1930s, Serna's fine book is a perfect complement to Robert McKee Irwin and Maricruz Castro Ricalde's Global Mexican Cinema (CH, Aug'14, 51-6647), which begins where this study leaves off. The early period was dominated by Hollywood films, representing an exciting, alarming modernity and exhibiting considerable insensitivity toward their neighbors to the south. Yet, as Serna (USC) demonstrates with admirable data and interpretive imagination, cinelandia was welcome to the politicians and capitalists who saw the distribution and exhibition of Hollywood films both as an opportunity and as evidence of post-revolutionary Mexico's movement into the modern age. For the vast numbers of rural transplants to the cities, movies provided cheap entertainments, and for women, especially las pelonas (Mexico's flappers), American films presented new styles, new ideas, and potentially a new definition of femininity--a consequence less welcome to the politicians and capitalists. In the US, Mexican communities in such cities as El Paso, San Antonio, and Los Angeles used cinemas to acculturate themselves to American life, and, through live Mexican entertainments and actors such as Dolores Del Rio and Ramon Novarro, to bolster their identity as Mexicans. --William A. Vincent, Michigan State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Laura Isabel Serna is Assistant Professor of Critical Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California.<br>

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