The feminist bookstore movement : lesbian antiracism and feminist accountability / Kristen Hogan.

By: Hogan, Kristen, 1976- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (xxvii, 272 pages, 22 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822374336; 0822374331Subject(s): Lesbian feminism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women's bookstores -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Feminist literature -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Anti-racism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Commerce | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Marketing -- General | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Sales & Selling -- General | Anti-racism | Feminist literature | Lesbian feminism | Women's bookstores | United States | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Women's Studies | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Feminist bookstore movement.DDC classification: 381.450020820973 LOC classification: HQ75.6.U5 | H64 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Dykes with a vision, 1970-1976 -- Revolutionaries in a capitalist system, 1976-1980 -- Accountable to each other, 1980-1983 -- The feminist shelf, a transnational project, 1984-1993 -- Economics and antiracist alliances, 1993-2003 -- Epilogue: Feminist remembering.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: Kristen Hogan traces the feminist bookstore movement's rise and fall, showing how the women at the heart of the movement developed theories and practices of lesbian antiracism and feminist accountability that continue to resonate today.
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HQ75.6.U5 H64 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11cw2fv Available ocn936113819

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Dykes with a vision, 1970-1976 -- Revolutionaries in a capitalist system, 1976-1980 -- Accountable to each other, 1980-1983 -- The feminist shelf, a transnational project, 1984-1993 -- Economics and antiracist alliances, 1993-2003 -- Epilogue: Feminist remembering.

Print version record.

Kristen Hogan traces the feminist bookstore movement's rise and fall, showing how the women at the heart of the movement developed theories and practices of lesbian antiracism and feminist accountability that continue to resonate today.

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Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2011 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hogan, Education Program Coordinator at the University of Texas Gender and Sexuality Center, offers an eminently readable text that traces the history of feminist bookstores from their rise in the 1970s through the 1990s. Chronological chapters examine the legacies of stores such as BookWoman in Austin and Old Wives' Tales in San Francisco, and how these stores were influenced by and in turn influenced the feminist movements and publishing industry. Most of the feminist bookstores are gone now, but their legacy won't be forgotten, nor will the women who owned the stores, mostly lesbians and women of color. These book women created "the feminist shelf," that area of prime real estate in the front or other prominent place in the bookstore where books people should be reading (sprinkled with mainstream authors for economic reasons) were located. The feminist bookstore was more than a place for purchasing books and supporting authors of color or women authors. The feminist bookstore was also a safe community space, a place for discourse and discovery, and a platform for authors and ideas. This work will appeal to scholars and everyday readers who enjoy microhistories. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Michelle Martinez, Sam Houston State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kristen Hogan, who worked at BookWoman in Austin and at the Toronto Women's Bookstore, is Education Program Coordinator for the University of Texas Gender and Sexuality Center at the University of Texas, Austin.

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