The revolution has come : Black power, gender, and the Black Panther Party in Oakland / Robyn C. Spencer.

By: Spencer, Robyn C, 1970- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (xv, 260 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text | still image Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822373537; 082237353XSubject(s): Black Panther Party | Black Panther Party | Black Panther Party | Black power -- California -- Oakland -- History -- 20th century | Black power -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African American political activists -- Interviews | African American social reformers -- Interviews | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Political Process -- Political Advocacy | African American political activists | African American social reformers | Black power | Civil rights movements | California -- Oakland | United States | Black power | Oakland, Calif | HISTORY / United States / 20th Century | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History. | Interviews.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Revolution has come.DDC classification: 322.4/20973 LOC classification: E185.615Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Seize the time : the roots of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California -- In defense of self-defense -- Moving on many fronts : the Black Panther Party's transformation from local organization to mass movement -- Inside political repression, 1969-1971 -- "Revolution is a process rather than a conclusion" : rebuilding the party, 1971-1974 -- The politics of survival : electoral politics and organizational transformation -- "I am we" : the demise of the Black Panther Party, 1977-1982.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: In The Revolution Has Come Robyn C. Spencer traces the Black Panther Party's organizational evolution in Oakland, California, examining how its internal politics along with external forces such as COINTELPRO shaped the Party's efforts at fostering self-determination in Oakland's black communities.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Seize the time : the roots of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California -- In defense of self-defense -- Moving on many fronts : the Black Panther Party's transformation from local organization to mass movement -- Inside political repression, 1969-1971 -- "Revolution is a process rather than a conclusion" : rebuilding the party, 1971-1974 -- The politics of survival : electoral politics and organizational transformation -- "I am we" : the demise of the Black Panther Party, 1977-1982.

In The Revolution Has Come Robyn C. Spencer traces the Black Panther Party's organizational evolution in Oakland, California, examining how its internal politics along with external forces such as COINTELPRO shaped the Party's efforts at fostering self-determination in Oakland's black communities.

Online resource; title from electronic title page (ebrary, viewed July 14, 2017).

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Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Spencer (Lehman College, CUNY) traces the rise, adaptation, and eventual decline of the Black Panther Party's original Oakland, CA, chapter. Unlike other scholarship that has foregrounded a handful of primarily male leaders, Spencer's account is a well-rounded organizational history. She taps rich new sources, including internal party documents, FBI records, and oral history interviews. The author deftly weaves together an impressive source base to present a cohesive and accessible narrative of the evolution of the Black Panther Party. Spencer makes three significant contributions. She illuminates the overlooked roles of female Panthers amidst complex gender dynamics within the organization. She also extends their story well beyond the early seventies, when they usually exit historical time lines, by focusing on Oakland. Finally, her balanced account shows the disturbing power of state repression while also acknowledging the Panthers' own personal and organizational shortcomings. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All general and academic libraries. --Alyssa Ribeiro, Allegheny College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robyn C. Spencer is Associate Professor of History at Lehman College, City University of New York.

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