The magic of concepts : history and the economic in twentieth-century China / Rebecca E. Karl.

By: Karl, Rebecca E [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (xii, 216 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822373322; 0822373327Subject(s): China -- Economic policy -- 1912-1949 | China -- Economic policy -- 1976-2000 | China -- History -- 20th century -- Historiography | China -- Politics and government -- History -- 20th century | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Economics -- General | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Reference | Economic policy | Historiography | Politics and government | China | HISTORY / Asia / China | 1900-2000Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Magic of concepts.DDC classification: 330.0951/0904 LOC classification: HC427 | .K27 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The economic, China, world history : a critique of pure ideology -- The economic and the state : the Asiatic mode of production -- The economic as transhistory : temporality, the market, and the Austrian school -- The economic as lived experience : semicolonialism and China -- The economic as culture and the culture of the economic : filming Shanghai.
Summary: Rebecca E. Karl interrogates the concept and practice of "the economic" as it was understood in China in the 1930s and the 1980s and 90s, showing how the use of Eurocentric philosophies, narratives, and conceptions of the economic that exist outside lived experiences fail to capture modern China's complex history.
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HC427 .K27 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv111jjh1 Available ocn956775680

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The economic, China, world history : a critique of pure ideology -- The economic and the state : the Asiatic mode of production -- The economic as transhistory : temporality, the market, and the Austrian school -- The economic as lived experience : semicolonialism and China -- The economic as culture and the culture of the economic : filming Shanghai.

Rebecca E. Karl interrogates the concept and practice of "the economic" as it was understood in China in the 1930s and the 1980s and 90s, showing how the use of Eurocentric philosophies, narratives, and conceptions of the economic that exist outside lived experiences fail to capture modern China's complex history.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 08, 2017).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In five long essays, Karl (NYU) explores the wide-ranging thought of Wang Yanan (1901-69), a Chinese economist, historian, sociologist, philosopher, and non-communist Marxist most active in the 1930s and 1940s; he co-translated Capital. Karl compares and contrasts Wang with a vast range of thinkers, both Chinese and Western. Like many, Wang sought to explain Chinese stagnation with cultural, state, class, imperialistic, and other theories, including "Asiatic mode of production," the Austrian School of capitalist universalism, and subordinate global status. Was China a singular case or merely late in climbing standard stages of economic development? Did China follow universal laws of change or take its own path? Does a combination of semi-feudalism and semi-colonialism explain China's lag? Wang eventually became president of Xiamen University, where he died during the Cultural Revolution. After rehabilitation, his collected works, which Karl read in the original, were published, and he enjoyed a modest revival. Karl's discussion of theories is complex, discursive, and abstract; she reviews no empirical evidence and does not link Wang to Maoist thought and practice--one can only suppose his influence. Recommended for scholars of economic development and Chinese economic thought. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students through faculty. --Michael G. Roskin, Lycoming College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Rebecca E. Karl is Associate Professor of History at New York University. She is the author of Mao Zedong and China in the Twentieth-Century World: A Concise History and Staging the World: Chinese Nationalism at the Turn of the Twentieth Century , and co-translator (with Xueping Zhong) of Cai Xiang's Revolution andIts Narratives: China's Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries, 1949-1966 , all also published by Duke University Press. She co-translated and coedited (with Lydia H. Liu and Dorothy Ko) The Birth of Chinese Feminism: Essential Texts in Transnational Theory .

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