Revolutionary nativism : fascism and culture in China, 1925-1937 / Maggie Clinton.

By: Clinton, Maggie [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (xi, 268 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822373032; 0822373033Subject(s): Zhongguo guo min dang | Zhongguo guo min dang | Zhong guo guo min dang | China -- History -- 1928-1937 | China -- Politics and government -- 1912-1949 | Politics and culture -- China | Fascism -- China | Nationalism -- China | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Essays | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Government -- General | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Government -- National | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Reference | Fascism | Nationalism | Politics and culture | Politics and government | China | Faschismus | Geschichte | Nationalismus | Antikommunismus | China | HISTORY / Asia / China | 1912-1949Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Revolutionary nativism.DDC classification: 320.53/3095109043 LOC classification: DS777.48 | .C59 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Hiding in plain sight : fascist factions during the Nanjing decade -- Spirit is eternal : cultural revolution from the right -- Spiritual offenses : the nativist prose of counterinsurgency -- Fixing the everyday : the new life movement and Taylorized modernity -- Literature and arts for the nation.
Action note: digitized 2020. committed to preserveSummary: "In Revolutionary Nativism Maggie Clinton traces the history and cultural politics of fascist organizations that operated under the umbrella of the Chinese Nationalist Party (GMD) during the 1920s and 1930s. Clinton argues that fascism was not imported to China from Europe or Japan; rather it emerged from the charged social conditions that prevailed in the country's southern and coastal regions during the interwar period. These fascist groups were led by young militants who believed that reviving China's Confucian "national spirit" could foster the discipline and social cohesion necessary to defend China against imperialism and Communism and to develop formidable industrial and military capacities, thereby securing national strength in a competitive international arena. Fascists within the GMD deployed modernist aesthetics in their literature and art while justifying their anti-Communist violence with nativist discourse. Showing how the GMD's fascist factions popularized a virulently nationalist rhetoric that linked Confucianism with a specific path of industrial development, Clinton sheds new light on the complex dynamics of Chinese nationalism and modernity."--Publisher's description
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DS777.48 .C59 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv1134gvp Available ocn959965489

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 239-254) and index.

Hiding in plain sight : fascist factions during the Nanjing decade -- Spirit is eternal : cultural revolution from the right -- Spiritual offenses : the nativist prose of counterinsurgency -- Fixing the everyday : the new life movement and Taylorized modernity -- Literature and arts for the nation.

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"In Revolutionary Nativism Maggie Clinton traces the history and cultural politics of fascist organizations that operated under the umbrella of the Chinese Nationalist Party (GMD) during the 1920s and 1930s. Clinton argues that fascism was not imported to China from Europe or Japan; rather it emerged from the charged social conditions that prevailed in the country's southern and coastal regions during the interwar period. These fascist groups were led by young militants who believed that reviving China's Confucian "national spirit" could foster the discipline and social cohesion necessary to defend China against imperialism and Communism and to develop formidable industrial and military capacities, thereby securing national strength in a competitive international arena. Fascists within the GMD deployed modernist aesthetics in their literature and art while justifying their anti-Communist violence with nativist discourse. Showing how the GMD's fascist factions popularized a virulently nationalist rhetoric that linked Confucianism with a specific path of industrial development, Clinton sheds new light on the complex dynamics of Chinese nationalism and modernity."--Publisher's description

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified]: HathiTrust Digital Library. 2020. MiAaHDL

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Clinton (Middlebury College) offers an insightful analysis of what she sees as China's fascist movement after the ascendance of Chiang Kai-shek in the political arena. By using copious sources, the author recounts those transitional years during which the Nationalist Party of China endeavored to realize its objectives of state-building and nation-building. Yet, multiple factions coexisted within the party, among which the CC Clique and the Blue Shirts had adopted fascist programs. Similar to European fascists, they emphasized loyalty to the state and unity of the nation. However, they underlined the vital role of Confucianism in establishing their new state. By highlighting Confucian values for national solidarity, political cohesion, and social harmony, Chinese fascists tried to utilize Confucianism to fight communism, liberalism, and imperialism. Chinese fascists penetrated into governmental organs, ran cultural enterprises, manipulated media, and participated in the New Life Movement. They silenced critical voices through intimidation and assassination. Although they never reached the level of the fascist movements in Europe and Japan, they animated the center of Chinese party politics. Among the few books on this topic, Clinton's monograph helps readers understand that unique page of modern Chinese history. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All public and academic levels/libraries. --Patrick Fuliang Shan, Grand Valley State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Maggie Clinton is Assistant Professor of History at Middlebury College.

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