Listening for Africa : freedom, modernity, and the logic of Black music's African origins / David F. Garcia.

By: García, David F [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (xii, 360 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822373117; 0822373114Subject(s): African Americans -- Music -- History and criticism | Blacks -- Music -- History and criticism | Dance music -- History and criticism | Music -- Africa -- History and criticism | MUSIC -- Genres & Styles -- Classical | MUSIC -- Reference | African Americans -- Music | Blacks -- Music | Dance music | Music | Africa | MUSIC / Ethnomusicology | musikk dans afroamerikanere musikkhistorie | Afrika USAGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Listening for Africa.DDC classification: 780.89/96073 LOC classification: ML3479 | .G37 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Analyzing the African origins of Negro music and dance in a time of racism, fascism, and war -- Listening to Africa in the city, in the laboratory, and on record -- Embodying Africa against racial oppression, ignorance, and colonialism -- Disalienating movement and sound from the pathologies of freedom and time -- Desiring Africa, or Western civilization's discontents -- Conclusion: dance-music as rhizome.
Summary: David F. Garcia examines the work of a wide range of musicians, dancers, academics, and activists between the 1930s and the 1950s to show how their belief in black music's African roots would provide the means to debunk racist ideologies, aid decolonization of Africa, and ease racial violence.
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ML3479 .G37 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11cw3vj Available ocn974035801

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Analyzing the African origins of Negro music and dance in a time of racism, fascism, and war -- Listening to Africa in the city, in the laboratory, and on record -- Embodying Africa against racial oppression, ignorance, and colonialism -- Disalienating movement and sound from the pathologies of freedom and time -- Desiring Africa, or Western civilization's discontents -- Conclusion: dance-music as rhizome.

David F. Garcia examines the work of a wide range of musicians, dancers, academics, and activists between the 1930s and the 1950s to show how their belief in black music's African roots would provide the means to debunk racist ideologies, aid decolonization of Africa, and ease racial violence.

Description based print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Looking at how the terms primitive, savage, and Africa--all commonly interpreted as a form of racism--are used in describing the Latino/a dance mambo and related styles of music, Garcia (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) seeks to demonstrate how the notion of someone's origins, regardless of racial, ethnic, sexual, or political status, can be interpreted differently. The author divides the book into five chapters, each devoted to an aspect of racism in music, dance, and theater involving Africans and their descendants in diaspora. The volume includes endnotes and a generous bibliography. This is not a book for casual readers, but scholars of Africanisms and race relations will appreciate Garcia's message. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --Kazadi Wa Mukuna, Kent State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David F. Garcia is Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and the author of Arsenio Rodríguez and the Transnational Flows of Latin Popular Music .

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