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Stolen life / Fred Moten.

By: Moten, Fred [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Consent not to be a single being.Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (xii, 321 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822372028; 0822372029.Subject(s): Black race -- Philosophy | Blacks -- Race identity -- Philosophy | Philosophy, Black | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Discrimination & Race Relations | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Minority Studies | Philosophy, Black | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Black Studies (Global)Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Essays. | Essays.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stolen life.DDC classification: 305.896 LOC classification: HT1581 | .M684 2018Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Knowledge of freedom -- Gestural critique of judgment -- Uplift and criminality -- The new international of decent feelings -- Rilya Wilson. Precious doe. Buried angel -- Black op -- The touring machine (flesh thought inside out) -- Seeing things -- Air shaft, rent party -- Notes on passage -- Here, there, and everywhere -- Anassignment letters -- The animaternalizing call -- Erotics of fugitivity.
Summary: In Stolen Life--the second volume in his landmark trilogy consent not to be a single being--Fred Moten undertakes an expansive exploration of blackness as it relates to black life and the collective refusal of social death. The essays resist categorization, moving from Moten's opening meditation on Kant, Olaudah Equiano, and the conditions of black thought through discussions of academic freedom, writing and pedagogy, non-neurotypicality, and uncritical notions of freedom. Moten also models black study as a form of social life through an engagement with Fanon, Hartman, and Spillers and plumbs the distinction between blackness and black people in readings of Du Bois and Nahum Chandler. The force and creativity of Moten's criticism resonate throughout, reminding us not only of his importance as a thinker, but of the continued necessity of interrogating blackness as a form of sociality.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HT1581 .M684 2018 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv111jj9x Available on1003854980

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Knowledge of freedom -- Gestural critique of judgment -- Uplift and criminality -- The new international of decent feelings -- Rilya Wilson. Precious doe. Buried angel -- Black op -- The touring machine (flesh thought inside out) -- Seeing things -- Air shaft, rent party -- Notes on passage -- Here, there, and everywhere -- Anassignment letters -- The animaternalizing call -- Erotics of fugitivity.

In Stolen Life--the second volume in his landmark trilogy consent not to be a single being--Fred Moten undertakes an expansive exploration of blackness as it relates to black life and the collective refusal of social death. The essays resist categorization, moving from Moten's opening meditation on Kant, Olaudah Equiano, and the conditions of black thought through discussions of academic freedom, writing and pedagogy, non-neurotypicality, and uncritical notions of freedom. Moten also models black study as a form of social life through an engagement with Fanon, Hartman, and Spillers and plumbs the distinction between blackness and black people in readings of Du Bois and Nahum Chandler. The force and creativity of Moten's criticism resonate throughout, reminding us not only of his importance as a thinker, but of the continued necessity of interrogating blackness as a form of sociality.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Fred Moten is Professor of Performance Studies at New York University and the author of Black and Blur and The Universal Machine , both also published by Duke University Press, and In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition .

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