The afterlife of reproductive slavery : biocapitalism and Black feminism's philosophy of history / Alys Eve Weinbaum.

By: Weinbaum, Alys Eve, 1967- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 1 online resource (ix, 286 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781478003281; 1478003286Subject(s): Womanism -- United States | Human reproduction -- Political aspects -- United States | Surrogate motherhood -- United States -- History | African American women -- Social conditions -- History | Women slaves -- Atlantic Ocean Region | Slavery -- United States -- History | Slavery -- Atlantic Ocean Region | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- Cultural Policy | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Anthropology -- Cultural | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Popular Culture | African American women -- Social conditions | Human reproduction -- Political aspects | Slavery | Surrogate motherhood | Womanism | Women slaves | Atlantic Ocean Region | United States | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Feminism & Feminist TheoryGenre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Afterlife of reproductive slavery.DDC classification: 306.3/620973 LOC classification: HT1523 | .W44 2019Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: human reproduction and the slave episteme -- The surrogacy/slavery nexus -- Black feminism as a philosophy of history -- Violent insurgency, or "power to the ice pick" -- The problem of reproductive freedom in neoliberalism -- A slave narrative for postracial times -- Epilogue: the end of men and the Black womb of the world.
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: In The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery Alys Eve Weinbaum investigates the continuing resonances of Atlantic slavery in the cultures and politics of human reproduction that characterize contemporary biocapitalism. As a form of racial capitalism that relies on the commodification of the human reproductive body, biocapitalism is dependent upon what Weinbaum calls the slave episteme--the racial logic that drove four centuries of slave breeding in the Americas and Caribbean. Weinbaum outlines how the slave episteme shapes the practice of reproduction today, especially through use of biotechnology and surrogacy. Engaging with a broad set of texts, from Toni Morrison's Beloved and Octavia Butler's dystopian speculative fiction to black Marxism, histories of slavery, and legal cases involving surrogacy, Weinbaum shows how Black feminist contributions from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s constitute a powerful philosophy of history--one that provides the means through which to understand how reproductive slavery haunts the present.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: human reproduction and the slave episteme -- The surrogacy/slavery nexus -- Black feminism as a philosophy of history -- Violent insurgency, or "power to the ice pick" -- The problem of reproductive freedom in neoliberalism -- A slave narrative for postracial times -- Epilogue: the end of men and the Black womb of the world.

In The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery Alys Eve Weinbaum investigates the continuing resonances of Atlantic slavery in the cultures and politics of human reproduction that characterize contemporary biocapitalism. As a form of racial capitalism that relies on the commodification of the human reproductive body, biocapitalism is dependent upon what Weinbaum calls the slave episteme--the racial logic that drove four centuries of slave breeding in the Americas and Caribbean. Weinbaum outlines how the slave episteme shapes the practice of reproduction today, especially through use of biotechnology and surrogacy. Engaging with a broad set of texts, from Toni Morrison's Beloved and Octavia Butler's dystopian speculative fiction to black Marxism, histories of slavery, and legal cases involving surrogacy, Weinbaum shows how Black feminist contributions from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s constitute a powerful philosophy of history--one that provides the means through which to understand how reproductive slavery haunts the present.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alys Eve Weinbaum is Professor of English at the University of Washington,author of Wayward Reproductions: Genealogies of Race and Nation in Transatlantic Modern Thought , and coeditor of The Modern Girl Around the World: Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization , both also published by Duke University Press.

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