Sacred men : law, torture, and retribution in Guam / Keith L. Camacho.

By: Camacho, Keith L [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksGlobal and insurgent legalities: Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2019Copyright date: ©2019Description: 1 online resource (xii, 295 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781478005667; 1478005661Subject(s): War crime trials -- Guam -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Atrocities -- Guam | Guam -- History -- Japanese occupation, 1941-1944 | HISTORY -- Military -- World War II | HISTORY -- Modern -- 20th Century | Atrocities | War crime trials | Guam | World War (1939-1945) | Japanese Occupation of Guam (Guam : 1941-1944) | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sacred men.DDC classification: 341.6/90268 LOC classification: KZ1186.G85 | C363 2019Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The state of exception -- War bodies -- War crimes -- The bird and the lizard -- Native assailants -- Native murderers -- The military colony -- Japanese traitors -- Japanese militarists.
Action note: digitized 2020. committed to preserveSummary: "Between 1944 and 1949 the United States Navy held a war crimes tribunal that tried Japanese nationals and members of Guam's indigenous Chamorro population who had worked for Japan's military government. In Sacred Men Keith L. Camacho traces the tribunal's legacy and its role in shaping contemporary domestic and international laws regarding combatants, jurisdiction, and property. Drawing on Giorgio Agamben's notions of bare life and Chamorro concepts of retribution, Camacho demonstrates how the U.S. tribunal used and justified imprisonment, torture, murder, and exiling of accused Japanese and Chamorro war criminals in order to institute a new American political order. This U.S. disciplinary logic in Guam, Camacho contends, continues to directly inform the ideology used to justify the Guantanamo Bay detention center, the torture and enhanced interrogation of enemy combatants, and the American carceral state."--Provided by publisher.
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KZ1186.G85 C363 2019 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11cw2db Available on1089777791

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The state of exception -- War bodies -- War crimes -- The bird and the lizard -- Native assailants -- Native murderers -- The military colony -- Japanese traitors -- Japanese militarists.

"Between 1944 and 1949 the United States Navy held a war crimes tribunal that tried Japanese nationals and members of Guam's indigenous Chamorro population who had worked for Japan's military government. In Sacred Men Keith L. Camacho traces the tribunal's legacy and its role in shaping contemporary domestic and international laws regarding combatants, jurisdiction, and property. Drawing on Giorgio Agamben's notions of bare life and Chamorro concepts of retribution, Camacho demonstrates how the U.S. tribunal used and justified imprisonment, torture, murder, and exiling of accused Japanese and Chamorro war criminals in order to institute a new American political order. This U.S. disciplinary logic in Guam, Camacho contends, continues to directly inform the ideology used to justify the Guantanamo Bay detention center, the torture and enhanced interrogation of enemy combatants, and the American carceral state."--Provided by publisher.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on December 13, 2019).

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Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified]: HathiTrust Digital Library. 2020. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Engaging what John Carlos Rowe calls "the still operative legacies of imperialism and neoimperialism in the Pacific," Camacho's study offers a unique perspective on the US Navy's war crimes tribunal held at the end of WW II, and explores the specific ways in which the US military continues to impose a new imperial order on the population in Guam. Through the lens of Giorgio Agamben's theory on homo sacer and the state of exception, Camacho (Univ. of California, Los Angeles) investigates how and why Japanese and Chamorro bodies were appropriated and differentiated, white property and sovereignty were mediated and represented, and punishment was negotiated and determined for the convicted Japanese war criminals and their Chamorro collaborators. He concludes by suggesting that the US imperial logic has extended to the current US war on terror and impacted the management of the Guantanamo Bay detention center. Provocative and engaging, Camacho's work not only breaks new ground in postcolonial and transpacific studies, but also calls attention to the role that Chamorro, Rotanese, and Saipanese indigenous epistemologies may play in the decolonization and deimperialization of US-occupied Guam. Summing Up: Recommended. Researchers and faculty. --Yuan Shu, Texas Tech University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Keith L. Camacho is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, author of Cultures of Commemoration: The Politics of War, Memory, and History in the Mariana Islands , and coeditor of Militarized Currents: Toward a Decolonized Future in Asia and the Pacific .

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