The castle of truth and other revolutionary tales / Hermynia zur Mühlen ; edited and translated by Jack Zipes ; illustrations by George Grosz, John Heartfield, Heinrich Vogeler, and Karl Holz.

By: Zur Mühlen, Hermynia, 1883-1951 [author.]Contributor(s): Zipes, Jack, 1937- [translator.]Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Original language: German Series: JSTOR eBooksOddly modern fairy tales: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (ix, 187 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0691201269; 9780691201269Uniform titles: Fairy tales. Selections. English Subject(s): Zur Mühlen, Hermynia, 1883-1951 -- Translations into English | Zur Mühlen, Hermynia, 1883-1951 | Fairy tales -- German | FICTION / Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology | Fairy talesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The castle of truth and other revolutionary talesDDC classification: 833/.912 LOC classification: PT2653.U7 | A2 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Frontmatter -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- A Note on the Illustrators -- Tales -- Bibliography
Summary: "Born to an artistocratic Catholic family, Hermynia zur Mühlen became a prolific writer and translator sometimes called the Red Countess for her left-wing ideas and revolutionary spirit. She began to write during the several years she spent in a sanitorium for tuberculosis, a disease she battled for the rest of her life. Exiled from Germany in the 1930s for her anti-Nazi convictions and her relationship with the German Jewish translator Stefan Klein, she eventually fled to England, where she spent her final years. The 17 fairy tales selected for this book were written primarily during her radical Weimar years and demonstrate the innovative techniques she used to raise the political consciousness of readers young and old. In contrast to the classical fairy tales of Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, and Hans Christian Andersen, Zur Mühlen's focus was on the plight of the working class and the cause of social justice. The endings of her tales were intended to encouarge political action. In "The Glasses," for example, readers are encouraged to rip off the glasses that deceive them; in "The Servant," readers learn that they must share the means of production to serve the people and not just the ruling classes. In "The Carriage Horse," horses organize a union to resist their working and living conditions. In "The Broom," a young worker learns how to sweep away injustice with a magic broom. As the scholar Lionel Grossman has written (quoted by Zipes in the introduction), "Zur Mühlen's fairy tales prescribe models of behavior radically opposed to those of traditional fairy tales, the basic lesson of which had been all that one's wishes will come true if one overcomes temptation and faithfully observes established norms of good conduct." The volume will include illustrations that originally accompanied the German tales, by George Grosz, Karl Holtz, Heinrich Vogeler, and other artists of the Weimar Republic. Jack Zipes's introduction provides biographical details and historical context"-- Provided by publisher.
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Translated from the German.

Includes bibliographical references.

"Born to an artistocratic Catholic family, Hermynia zur Mühlen became a prolific writer and translator sometimes called the Red Countess for her left-wing ideas and revolutionary spirit. She began to write during the several years she spent in a sanitorium for tuberculosis, a disease she battled for the rest of her life. Exiled from Germany in the 1930s for her anti-Nazi convictions and her relationship with the German Jewish translator Stefan Klein, she eventually fled to England, where she spent her final years. The 17 fairy tales selected for this book were written primarily during her radical Weimar years and demonstrate the innovative techniques she used to raise the political consciousness of readers young and old. In contrast to the classical fairy tales of Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, and Hans Christian Andersen, Zur Mühlen's focus was on the plight of the working class and the cause of social justice. The endings of her tales were intended to encouarge political action. In "The Glasses," for example, readers are encouraged to rip off the glasses that deceive them; in "The Servant," readers learn that they must share the means of production to serve the people and not just the ruling classes. In "The Carriage Horse," horses organize a union to resist their working and living conditions. In "The Broom," a young worker learns how to sweep away injustice with a magic broom. As the scholar Lionel Grossman has written (quoted by Zipes in the introduction), "Zur Mühlen's fairy tales prescribe models of behavior radically opposed to those of traditional fairy tales, the basic lesson of which had been all that one's wishes will come true if one overcomes temptation and faithfully observes established norms of good conduct." The volume will include illustrations that originally accompanied the German tales, by George Grosz, Karl Holtz, Heinrich Vogeler, and other artists of the Weimar Republic. Jack Zipes's introduction provides biographical details and historical context"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 16, 2020).

Frontmatter -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- A Note on the Illustrators -- Tales -- Bibliography

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jack Zipes is the translator of The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm and editor of The Sorcerer's Apprentice (both Princeton), as well as editor of The Great Fairy Tale Tradition (Norton). He is professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota.

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