German, Jew, Muslim, gay : the life and times of Hugo Marcus / Marc David Baer.

By: Baer, Marc David, 1970- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0231551789; 9780231551786Subject(s): Marcus, Hugo, 1880-1966 | Gay men -- Germany -- Biography | Muslim converts from Judaism -- Germany -- Biography | Holocaust survivors -- Germany -- Biography | Jews -- Europe -- History -- 20th century | Muslims -- Europe -- History -- 20th century | Europe -- Ethnic relations -- History -- 20th century | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY -- Literary Figures | HISTORY / Europe / Germany | Ethnic relations | Gay men | Holocaust survivors | Jews | Muslims | Europe | Germany | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books. | Biographies. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: German, Jew, Muslim, gay.DDC classification: 306.76/62092 | B LOC classification: HQ75.8.M326Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Goethe as pole star -- Fighting for gay rights in Berlin, 1900-1925 -- Queer convert: Protestant Islam in Weimar Germany, 1925-1933 -- A Jewish Muslim in Nazi Berlin, 1933-1939 -- Who writes lives: Swiss refuge, 1939-1965 -- Hans Alienus: yearning, gay writer, 1948-1965 -- Conclusion: a Goethe mosque for Berlin.
Summary: "German, Jew, Muslim, Gay offers an astonishing perspective on the history of modern Germany through the vantage point of a man with multiple identities who devoted his life to religious utopias, fought for homosexual rights, wrote gay fiction, converted from Judaism to Islam (one of the few of any faith to do so), and considered himself part of a spiritual elite that held the key to Germany's salvation. Born in Posen in 1880, the son of a Jewish industrialist, Hugo Marcus converted to Islam and chose the name Hamid; he became the most important convert in Germany while retaining his membership in the Jewish community. He was renamed Israel by the Nazis and sent to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in 1938, where he was in the unique position of Muslim witness to the Holocaust. The imam of his mosque gained his release and he escaped to Switzerland, where he wrote gay fiction under the pen name Hans Alienus. He died in Basel in 1966. The book challenges deeply ingrained perceptions of Muslim-Jewish relations during World War II and illuminates their interconnected histories in modern Europe. It also tells the unknown story of Marcus' orientalized Islam that, in echoing Goethe's, revitalized an essential strand of Germany's spiritual heritage"-- Provided by publisher.
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HQ75.8.M326 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/baer19670 Available on1119063899

Includes bibliographical references.

Introduction: Goethe as pole star -- Fighting for gay rights in Berlin, 1900-1925 -- Queer convert: Protestant Islam in Weimar Germany, 1925-1933 -- A Jewish Muslim in Nazi Berlin, 1933-1939 -- Who writes lives: Swiss refuge, 1939-1965 -- Hans Alienus: yearning, gay writer, 1948-1965 -- Conclusion: a Goethe mosque for Berlin.

"German, Jew, Muslim, Gay offers an astonishing perspective on the history of modern Germany through the vantage point of a man with multiple identities who devoted his life to religious utopias, fought for homosexual rights, wrote gay fiction, converted from Judaism to Islam (one of the few of any faith to do so), and considered himself part of a spiritual elite that held the key to Germany's salvation. Born in Posen in 1880, the son of a Jewish industrialist, Hugo Marcus converted to Islam and chose the name Hamid; he became the most important convert in Germany while retaining his membership in the Jewish community. He was renamed Israel by the Nazis and sent to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in 1938, where he was in the unique position of Muslim witness to the Holocaust. The imam of his mosque gained his release and he escaped to Switzerland, where he wrote gay fiction under the pen name Hans Alienus. He died in Basel in 1966. The book challenges deeply ingrained perceptions of Muslim-Jewish relations during World War II and illuminates their interconnected histories in modern Europe. It also tells the unknown story of Marcus' orientalized Islam that, in echoing Goethe's, revitalized an essential strand of Germany's spiritual heritage"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Marc David Baer is professor of international history at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is the author of Honored by the Glory of Islam: Conversion and Conquest in Ottoman Europe (2008); The Dönme: Jewish Converts, Muslim Revolutionaries, and Secular Turks (2010); and Sultanic Saviors and Tolerant Turks: Writing Ottoman Jewish History, Denying the Armenian Genocide (2020).

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