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Making the cut : hiring decisions, bias, and the consequences of nonstandard, mismatched, and precarious employment / David S. Pedulla

By: Pedulla, David S, 1982- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton, New Jersey : Princeton University Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 190 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0691200076; 9780691200071.Subject(s): Precarious employment | Employee selection | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sociology / General | Employee selection | Precarious employmentGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Making the cutDDC classification: 658.3/112 LOC classification: HD5857 | .P43 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Frontmatter -- CONTENTS -- PREFACE -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- 1. Hiring in the New Economy -- 2. Nonstandard, Mismatched, and Precarious Work -- 3. Making Meaning of Employment Histories: Signals, Uncertainty, and the Need for a Narrative -- 4. Inclusion and Exclusion in Hiring: The Varied Effects of Nonstandard, Mismatched, and Precarious Employment Histories -- 5. "What Type of a Grown Man Doesn't Have a Full-Time Job?": Gender and Part-Time Work -- 6. "Maybe It's More Natural for Them to Have Been Out of Work for a Little While": Race and Unemployment -- 7. "They Do a Pretty Thorough Background Check": THA Employment and African American Men -- 8. Conclusion -- Methodological Appendix -- Notes -- References -- Index
Summary: "Millions of workers today labor in nontraditional situations involving part-time work, temporary agency employment, and skills underutilization or face the precariousness of long-term unemployment. To date, research has largely focused on how these experiences shape workers' well-being, rather than how hiring agents perceive and treat job applicants who have moved through these positions. Shifting the focus from workers to hiring agents, Making the Cut explores how key gatekeepers-HR managers, recruiters, talent acquisition specialists-evaluate workers with nonstandard, mismatched, or precarious employment experience. Factoring in the social groups to which workers belong-such as their race and gender-David Pedulla shows how workers get jobs, how the hiring process unfolds, who makes the cut, and who does not. Drawing on a field experiment examining hiring decisions in four occupational groups and in-depth interviews with hiring agents in the United States, Pedulla documents and unpacks three important discoveries. Hiring professionals extract distinct meanings from different types of employment experiences; the effects of nonstandard, mismatched, and precarious employment histories for workers' job outcomes are not all the same; and the race and gender of workers intersect with their employment histories to shape which workers get called back for jobs. Indeed, hiring professionals use group-based stereotypes to weave divergent narratives or "stratified stories" about workers with similar employment experiences. The result is a complex set of inequalities in the labor market. Looking at bias and discrimination, social exclusion in the workplace, and the changing nature of work, Making the Cut probes the hiring process and offers a clearer picture of the underpinnings of getting a job in the new economy"-- Provided by publisher
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD5857 .P43 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvr7fb3s Available on1122715575

Description based on print version record

Includes bibliographical references and index

"Millions of workers today labor in nontraditional situations involving part-time work, temporary agency employment, and skills underutilization or face the precariousness of long-term unemployment. To date, research has largely focused on how these experiences shape workers' well-being, rather than how hiring agents perceive and treat job applicants who have moved through these positions. Shifting the focus from workers to hiring agents, Making the Cut explores how key gatekeepers-HR managers, recruiters, talent acquisition specialists-evaluate workers with nonstandard, mismatched, or precarious employment experience. Factoring in the social groups to which workers belong-such as their race and gender-David Pedulla shows how workers get jobs, how the hiring process unfolds, who makes the cut, and who does not. Drawing on a field experiment examining hiring decisions in four occupational groups and in-depth interviews with hiring agents in the United States, Pedulla documents and unpacks three important discoveries. Hiring professionals extract distinct meanings from different types of employment experiences; the effects of nonstandard, mismatched, and precarious employment histories for workers' job outcomes are not all the same; and the race and gender of workers intersect with their employment histories to shape which workers get called back for jobs. Indeed, hiring professionals use group-based stereotypes to weave divergent narratives or "stratified stories" about workers with similar employment experiences. The result is a complex set of inequalities in the labor market. Looking at bias and discrimination, social exclusion in the workplace, and the changing nature of work, Making the Cut probes the hiring process and offers a clearer picture of the underpinnings of getting a job in the new economy"-- Provided by publisher

Frontmatter -- CONTENTS -- PREFACE -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- 1. Hiring in the New Economy -- 2. Nonstandard, Mismatched, and Precarious Work -- 3. Making Meaning of Employment Histories: Signals, Uncertainty, and the Need for a Narrative -- 4. Inclusion and Exclusion in Hiring: The Varied Effects of Nonstandard, Mismatched, and Precarious Employment Histories -- 5. "What Type of a Grown Man Doesn't Have a Full-Time Job?": Gender and Part-Time Work -- 6. "Maybe It's More Natural for Them to Have Been Out of Work for a Little While": Race and Unemployment -- 7. "They Do a Pretty Thorough Background Check": THA Employment and African American Men -- 8. Conclusion -- Methodological Appendix -- Notes -- References -- Index

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David S. Pedulla is associate professor of sociology at Stanford University.

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