Freedom incorporated : anticommunism and Philippine independence in the age of decolonization / Colleen Woods.

By: Woods, Colleen, 1980- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Ithaca, New York : Cornell University Press, 2020Copyright date: ©2020Description: 1 online resource : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501749155; 1501749153; 9781501749148; 1501749145Subject(s): Anti-communist movements -- Philippines | Anti-imperialist movements -- Philippines | Decolonization -- Philippines | Postcolonialism -- Philippines | Philippines -- Politics and government -- 20th century | United States -- Foreign relations -- Philippines | Philippines -- Foreign relations -- United States | HISTORY / Modern / 20th Century | Anti-communist movements | Anti-imperialist movements | Decolonization | Diplomatic relations | Politics and government | Postcolonialism | Philippines | United States | 1900-1999Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Freedom incorporatedDDC classification: 959.904 LOC classification: DS685 | .W775 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : A Decolonized Empire -- An Amazing Record of Red Plotting : Policing Radical and Racial Boundaries in the Colonial Philippines -- State Violence and the Problem of Political Legitimacy : WWII, Philippine Independence, and the Hukbalahap -- The Anti-Communist International : The Philippine Front and Global Anticommunist Warfare -- Efficient, Honest, and Democratic : US Foreign Aid, Public Administration, and the Campaign Against Corruption -- A Dirty, Half-Hidden War : The CIA and US-Philippine Covert Operations in Southeast Asia -- Epilogue : A Friendship Written in Blood.
Summary: "Freedom Incorporated tells the story of American and Filipino anticommunists who sought to turn the Philippines into a laboratory for exportable models of decolonization, postcolonial statehood, and anticommunist warfare"-- Provided by publisher.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS685 .W775 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctvq2w2gn Available on1124772188

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction : A Decolonized Empire -- An Amazing Record of Red Plotting : Policing Radical and Racial Boundaries in the Colonial Philippines -- State Violence and the Problem of Political Legitimacy : WWII, Philippine Independence, and the Hukbalahap -- The Anti-Communist International : The Philippine Front and Global Anticommunist Warfare -- Efficient, Honest, and Democratic : US Foreign Aid, Public Administration, and the Campaign Against Corruption -- A Dirty, Half-Hidden War : The CIA and US-Philippine Covert Operations in Southeast Asia -- Epilogue : A Friendship Written in Blood.

"Freedom Incorporated tells the story of American and Filipino anticommunists who sought to turn the Philippines into a laboratory for exportable models of decolonization, postcolonial statehood, and anticommunist warfare"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on April 30, 2020).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Woods (Univ. of Maryland) presents a complex revisionist history of the relationship between the US and the Philippines during the early decades of the Cold War. This thoroughly researched monograph shines a light on the ambiguities of American anti-imperialist ideology and rhetoric in a polarized Cold War world. Far from a success story of postcolonial independence, the Philippine government exhibited many elements of continued subservience to US foreign policy and even compromised its own domestic policy to appease American interests. The implementation of US policy frequently took an unwavering anti-communist approach while simultaneously applauding Philippine independence. Through overt and covert military and civilian operations, the US government interfered intimately in Philippine political independence and overwhelmingly did so under the auspices of anti-communism in both the archipelago and the broader Asian geography. The now-common claims of American imperial, racial, and economic motivations have the ring of truth, but they are insufficiently contextualized within the formidable ideological limitations of the early Cold War. Freedom Incorporated complicates the reader's understanding of the role of the US regarding Philippine independence in the toxic atmosphere of the early Cold War. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Jim Rogers, Louisiana State University Alexandria

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Colleen Woods is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maryland. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in, LABOR, The Journal of Contemporary History , and the Wiley-Blackwell Companion to U.S. Foreign Relations .

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.