Aaron McDuffie Moore : an African American physician, educator, and founder of Durham's black Wall Street / Blake Hill-Saya ; with a foreword by U.S. Representative G.K. Butterfield and an afterword by C. Eileen Watts Welch.

By: Hill-Saya, Blake [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (xii, 258 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469655871; 146965587X; 9781469655864; 1469655861Subject(s): Moore, A. M. (Aaron McDuffie), 1863-1923 | Moore, A. M. (Aaron McDuffie), 1863-1923 | Moore, A. M. (Aaron McDuffie), 1863-1923 | African American physicians -- North Carolina -- Durham -- Biography | African American businesspeople -- North Carolina -- Durham -- Biography | African American civic leaders -- North Carolina -- Durham -- Biography | Hayti (Durham, N.C.) -- History -- 20th century | Physicians | African Americans | North Carolina | African American businesspeople | African American civic leaders | African American physicians | North Carolina -- Durham | North Carolina -- Durham -- Hayti | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural HeritageGenre/Form: Biography. | Electronic books. | Biographies. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Aaron McDuffie Moore.DDC classification: 610.89/96073092 LOC classification: R154.M725 | H55 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Aaron McDuffie Moore (1863-1923) was born in rural Columbus County in eastern North Carolina at the close of the Civil War. Defying the odds stacked against an African American of this era, he pursued an education, alternating between work on the family farm and attending school. Moore originally dreamed of becoming an educator and attended notable teacher training schools in the state. But later, while at Shaw University, he followed another passion and entered Leonard Medical School. Dr. Moore graduated with honors in 1888 and became the first practicing African American physician in the city of Durham, North Carolina. He went on to establish the Durham Drug Company and the Durham Colored Library; spearhead and run Lincoln Hospital, the city's first secular, freestanding African American hospital; cofound North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company; help launch Rosenwald schools for African American children statewide; and foster the development of Durham's Hayti community. His legacy can still be seen on the city streets and country backroads today, and an examination of his life provides key insights into the history of Durham, the state, and the nation during Reconstruction and the beginning of the Jim Crow Era"-- Provided by publisher.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Aaron McDuffie Moore (1863-1923) was born in rural Columbus County in eastern North Carolina at the close of the Civil War. Defying the odds stacked against an African American of this era, he pursued an education, alternating between work on the family farm and attending school. Moore originally dreamed of becoming an educator and attended notable teacher training schools in the state. But later, while at Shaw University, he followed another passion and entered Leonard Medical School. Dr. Moore graduated with honors in 1888 and became the first practicing African American physician in the city of Durham, North Carolina. He went on to establish the Durham Drug Company and the Durham Colored Library; spearhead and run Lincoln Hospital, the city's first secular, freestanding African American hospital; cofound North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company; help launch Rosenwald schools for African American children statewide; and foster the development of Durham's Hayti community. His legacy can still be seen on the city streets and country backroads today, and an examination of his life provides key insights into the history of Durham, the state, and the nation during Reconstruction and the beginning of the Jim Crow Era"-- Provided by publisher.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on March 17, 2020).

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