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Contested records : the turn to documents in contemporary North American poetry / by Michael Leong.

By: Leong, Michael, 1978- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Contemporary North American poetry series: Publisher: Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, 2020Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1609386906; 9781609386900.Subject(s): Documentary poetry, American -- History and criticism | American poetry -- 20th century -- History and criticism | American poetry -- 21st century -- History and criticism | LITERARY CRITICISM / GeneralGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Contested recordsDDC classification: 811/.050906 LOC classification: PS309.D63Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: documental poetics -- "It matters what you call a thing": documentary, investigative, conceptual, documental -- Documentation, paranoia, and aspiration: on Amiri Baraka and R.B. Kitaj -- "Work itself is given a voice": labor, deskilling, and reskilling in Kenneth Goldsmith and Mark Nowak -- The fate of late conceptualism -- Meta-publicity and the public sphere: on Claudia Rankine and Kenneth Goldsmith -- Afterword: whither poetry?
Summary: "Why have so many contemporary poets turned to source material, from newspapers to governmental records, as inspiration for their poetry? How can citational poems offer a means of social engagement? What are the advantages and perils of appropriating text? Synthesizing research in cultural memory studies, art history, public sphere theory, and the history of the humanities, Michael Leong answers such questions as he argues that poems driven by the remixing and reframing of found texts powerfully engage with the collective ways we remember, forget, and remember again. Going well beyond Wordsworthian recollections in tranquility, authors of such research-driven and mnemotechnic work use previous inscriptions as a springboard into public intellectualism This is the first book-length study to examine conceptual writing and documentary poetry under the same cover, showing how diverse writers associated with different poetry communities have a common interest in documentation. Putting into provocative conversation writers such as Amiri Baraka, Kenneth Goldsmith, R.B. Kitaj, Mark Nowak, M. NourbeSe Philip, Vanessa Place, and Claudia Rankine, Leong analyzes a range of twenty-first-century poems that have been reviled, celebrated, or in some cases met with equally telling indifference. In doing so, Leong offers nuanced and non-polemical treatments of some of the most controversial debates about race and ethnicity in twenty-first century literary culture. Situating his objects of study within the wider context of the humanities, Leong's Extending the Document in Contemporary North American Poetry suggests nothing less than a continual extension of our conceptions of poetry"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS309.D63 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv104tb5d Available on1151078925

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: documental poetics -- "It matters what you call a thing": documentary, investigative, conceptual, documental -- Documentation, paranoia, and aspiration: on Amiri Baraka and R.B. Kitaj -- "Work itself is given a voice": labor, deskilling, and reskilling in Kenneth Goldsmith and Mark Nowak -- The fate of late conceptualism -- Meta-publicity and the public sphere: on Claudia Rankine and Kenneth Goldsmith -- Afterword: whither poetry?

"Why have so many contemporary poets turned to source material, from newspapers to governmental records, as inspiration for their poetry? How can citational poems offer a means of social engagement? What are the advantages and perils of appropriating text? Synthesizing research in cultural memory studies, art history, public sphere theory, and the history of the humanities, Michael Leong answers such questions as he argues that poems driven by the remixing and reframing of found texts powerfully engage with the collective ways we remember, forget, and remember again. Going well beyond Wordsworthian recollections in tranquility, authors of such research-driven and mnemotechnic work use previous inscriptions as a springboard into public intellectualism This is the first book-length study to examine conceptual writing and documentary poetry under the same cover, showing how diverse writers associated with different poetry communities have a common interest in documentation. Putting into provocative conversation writers such as Amiri Baraka, Kenneth Goldsmith, R.B. Kitaj, Mark Nowak, M. NourbeSe Philip, Vanessa Place, and Claudia Rankine, Leong analyzes a range of twenty-first-century poems that have been reviled, celebrated, or in some cases met with equally telling indifference. In doing so, Leong offers nuanced and non-polemical treatments of some of the most controversial debates about race and ethnicity in twenty-first century literary culture. Situating his objects of study within the wider context of the humanities, Leong's Extending the Document in Contemporary North American Poetry suggests nothing less than a continual extension of our conceptions of poetry"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

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