The year of peril : America in 1942 / Tracy Campbell.

By: Campbell, Tracy [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 384 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300252835; 0300252838Other title: America in 1942 | America in nineteen forty-twoSubject(s): United States -- Civilization -- 1918-1945 | World War, 1939-1945 -- United States | Nineteen forty-two, A.DGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Year of Peril : America In 1942DDC classification: 973.917 LOC classification: E806 | .C36 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- December 1941-"The Most Tremendous Undertaking" -- 1 January-State of the Union -- 2 February-"The Worst Week of the Century" -- 3 March-Total War -- 4 April-"General Max" -- 5 May-"These Fascist Economic Measures" -- 6 June-Rumors of War -- 7 July-"The Principles of Democracy" -- 8 August-"Insuperable Difficulties" -- 9 September-"Threat of Economic Chaos" -- 10 October-"Pay As You Go" -- 11 November-Second Fronts -- 12 December-A New Democratic Capitalism -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Bibliography.
Summary: A fascinating chronicle of how the character of American society revealed itself under the duress of World War II.Summary: The Second World War exists in the American historical imagination as a time of unity and optimism. In 1942, however, after a series of defeats in the Pacific and the struggle to establish a beachhead on the European front, America seemed to be on the brink of defeat and was beginning to splinter from within. Exploring this precarious moment, Tracy Campbell paints a portrait of the deep social, economic, and political fault lines that pitted factions of citizens against each other in the post-Pearl Harbor era, even as the nation mobilized, government-aided industrial infrastructure blossomed, and parents sent their sons off to war. This captivating look at how American society responded to the greatest stress experienced since the Civil War reveals the various ways, both good and bad, that the trauma of 1942 forced Americans to redefine their relationship with democracy in ways that continue to affect us today.
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E806 .C36 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv10sm9bp Available on1153810446

Cover -- Half Title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- December 1941-"The Most Tremendous Undertaking" -- 1 January-State of the Union -- 2 February-"The Worst Week of the Century" -- 3 March-Total War -- 4 April-"General Max" -- 5 May-"These Fascist Economic Measures" -- 6 June-Rumors of War -- 7 July-"The Principles of Democracy" -- 8 August-"Insuperable Difficulties" -- 9 September-"Threat of Economic Chaos" -- 10 October-"Pay As You Go" -- 11 November-Second Fronts -- 12 December-A New Democratic Capitalism -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Bibliography.

A fascinating chronicle of how the character of American society revealed itself under the duress of World War II.

The Second World War exists in the American historical imagination as a time of unity and optimism. In 1942, however, after a series of defeats in the Pacific and the struggle to establish a beachhead on the European front, America seemed to be on the brink of defeat and was beginning to splinter from within. Exploring this precarious moment, Tracy Campbell paints a portrait of the deep social, economic, and political fault lines that pitted factions of citizens against each other in the post-Pearl Harbor era, even as the nation mobilized, government-aided industrial infrastructure blossomed, and parents sent their sons off to war. This captivating look at how American society responded to the greatest stress experienced since the Civil War reveals the various ways, both good and bad, that the trauma of 1942 forced Americans to redefine their relationship with democracy in ways that continue to affect us today.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on May 26, 2020).

Author notes provided by Syndetics

CampbellTracy:
Tracy Campbell is the E. Vernon Smith and Eloise C. Smith Professor of American History at the University of Kentucky. His previous books include The Gateway Arch: A Biography and Deliver the Vote: A History of Election Fraud, an American Political Tradition, 1742-2004.

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