Incognegro : a memoir of exile & apartheid / Frank B. Wilderson, III.

By: Wilderson, Frank B., III, 1956- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2015Copyright date: ©2008Description: 1 online resource (498 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822374985; 0822374986Subject(s): African Americans -- Biography | African Americans -- Race identity | African Americans -- South Africa -- Biography | Anti-apartheid movements -- South Africa -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Incognegro.DDC classification: 305.896/073 LOC classification: E185.97.W6128 | A3 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Part One; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Part Two; Chapter 6; Chapter 7; Chapter 8; Chapter 9; Chapter 10; Chapter 11; Glossary; Acknowledgments
Summary: In 1995, a South African journalist informed Frank Wilderson, one of only two American members of the African National Congress (ANC), that President Nelson Mandela considered him "a threat to national security." Wilderson was asked to comment. Incognegro is that "comment." It is also his response to a question posed five years later in a California university classroom: "How come you came back?" Although Wilderson recollects his turbulent life as an expatriate during the furious last gasps of apartheid, Incognegro is at heart a quintessentially American story. During South Africa's transition, Wilderson taught at universities in Johannesburg and Soweto by day. By night, he helped the ANC coordinate clandestine propaganda, launch psychological warfare, and more. In this mesmerizing political memoir, Wilderson's lyrical prose flows from unspeakable dilemmas in the red dust and ruin of South Africa to his return to political battles raging quietly on US campuses and in his intimate life. Readers will find themselves suddenly overtaken by the subtle but resolute force of Wilderson's biting wit, rare vulnerability, and insistence on bearing witness to history no matter the cost.
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E185.97.W6128 A3 2015 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11vc7t1 Available ocn918910117

In 1995, a South African journalist informed Frank Wilderson, one of only two American members of the African National Congress (ANC), that President Nelson Mandela considered him "a threat to national security." Wilderson was asked to comment. Incognegro is that "comment." It is also his response to a question posed five years later in a California university classroom: "How come you came back?" Although Wilderson recollects his turbulent life as an expatriate during the furious last gasps of apartheid, Incognegro is at heart a quintessentially American story. During South Africa's transition, Wilderson taught at universities in Johannesburg and Soweto by day. By night, he helped the ANC coordinate clandestine propaganda, launch psychological warfare, and more. In this mesmerizing political memoir, Wilderson's lyrical prose flows from unspeakable dilemmas in the red dust and ruin of South Africa to his return to political battles raging quietly on US campuses and in his intimate life. Readers will find themselves suddenly overtaken by the subtle but resolute force of Wilderson's biting wit, rare vulnerability, and insistence on bearing witness to history no matter the cost.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

English.

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Part One; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Part Two; Chapter 6; Chapter 7; Chapter 8; Chapter 9; Chapter 10; Chapter 11; Glossary; Acknowledgments

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frank B. Wilderson III is Professor of African American Studies and Drama at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Red, White and Black: Cinema and the Structure of U.S. Antagonisms , also published by Duke University Press.

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