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Africa in the Indian imagination : race and the politics of postcolonial citation / Antoinette Burton ; foreword by Isabel Hofmeyr.

By: Burton, Antoinette M, 1961- [author.].
Contributor(s): Hofmeyr, Isabel [writer of foreword.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (xv, 184 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822374138; 0822374137.Other title: Brown over black.Subject(s): Race -- Political aspects -- India | Race -- Political aspects -- Africa | Postcolonialism -- India | Postcolonialism -- Africa | Race in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Africa in the Indian imagination.DDC classification: 303.48/25406 LOC classification: DS450.A35 | B87 2016Other classification: 15.77 | 15.92 | HP 1240 | HQ 6040 | LB 49465 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Citing/siting Africa in the Indian postcolonial imagination -- Every secret thing? Racial politics in Ansuyah R. Singh's Behold the earth mourns (1960) -- Race and the politics of position: above and below in Frank Moraes' The Importance of being black (1965) -- Fictions of postcolonial development: race, intimacy and Afro-Asian solidarity in Chanakya Sen's The morning after (1973) -- Hands and feet: Phyllis Naidoo's impressions of anti-apartheid history (2002-2006).
Action note: digitized 2011 committed to preserveSummary: Antoinette Burton challenges nostalgic narratives of the Afro-Asian solidarity that emerged from the 1955 Bandung conference by showing how postcolonial Indian identity was based on the subordination of Africans and blackness.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS450.A35 B87 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv125jpq3 Available ocn934834880

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Citing/siting Africa in the Indian postcolonial imagination -- Every secret thing? Racial politics in Ansuyah R. Singh's Behold the earth mourns (1960) -- Race and the politics of position: above and below in Frank Moraes' The Importance of being black (1965) -- Fictions of postcolonial development: race, intimacy and Afro-Asian solidarity in Chanakya Sen's The morning after (1973) -- Hands and feet: Phyllis Naidoo's impressions of anti-apartheid history (2002-2006).

Originally published as Brown over Black by :Gurgaon : Three Essays Collective, 2012.

Print version record.

Antoinette Burton challenges nostalgic narratives of the Afro-Asian solidarity that emerged from the 1955 Bandung conference by showing how postcolonial Indian identity was based on the subordination of Africans and blackness.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2011. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2011 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

English.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Antoinette Burton is Professor of History and Catherine C. and Bruce A. Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She has written and edited many books, including Ten Books That Shaped the British Empire: Creating an Imperial Commons , Postcolonial Studies and Beyond , and A Primer for Teaching World History: Ten Design Principles , all also published by Duke University Press.<br> <br> Isabel Hofmeyr is Professor of African Literature at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and the author of Gandhi's Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading .

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