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The politics of higher education : the Imperial University in Northern Song China / Chu Ming-kin.

By: Chu, Ming-kin [author.].
Contributor(s): Project Muse [distributor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Hong Kong : Hong Kong University Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (xii, 264 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789882205543; 9882205542.Subject(s): College graduates -- Employment -- ChinaAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 378.51/0902 LOC classification: LA1131.8 | .C587 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The gradual transformation of the metropolitan schools -- Foreshadowing major reforms : the interim transition -- The politics of reform at the imperial university -- Factional politics and policy reversals -- Recruiting moral officials : a new experiment -- Contesting political and ideological control.
Summary: The Politics of Higher Education: The Imperial University in Northern Song China uses the history of the Imperial University of the Northern Song to show the limits of the Song emperors' powers. At the time, the university played an increasingly dominant role in selecting government officials. This role somehow curtailed the authority of the Song emperors, who did not possess absolute power and, more often than not, found their actions to be constrained by the institution. The nomination mechanism left room for political maneuvering and stakeholders--from emperors to scholar-officials--tried to influence the process. Hence, power struggles among successive emperors trying to assert their imperial authority ensued. Demands for greater autonomy by officials were, for example, unceasing. Chu Ming-kin shows that the road to autocracy was anything but linear. In fact, during the Northern Song dynasty, competition and compromises over diverse agendas constantly altered the political landscape.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LA1131.8 .C587 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv12fw74t Available on1146294741

Issued as part of book collections on Project MUSE.

Includes bibliographical references (pages [221]-251) and index.

The gradual transformation of the metropolitan schools -- Foreshadowing major reforms : the interim transition -- The politics of reform at the imperial university -- Factional politics and policy reversals -- Recruiting moral officials : a new experiment -- Contesting political and ideological control.

The Politics of Higher Education: The Imperial University in Northern Song China uses the history of the Imperial University of the Northern Song to show the limits of the Song emperors' powers. At the time, the university played an increasingly dominant role in selecting government officials. This role somehow curtailed the authority of the Song emperors, who did not possess absolute power and, more often than not, found their actions to be constrained by the institution. The nomination mechanism left room for political maneuvering and stakeholders--from emperors to scholar-officials--tried to influence the process. Hence, power struggles among successive emperors trying to assert their imperial authority ensued. Demands for greater autonomy by officials were, for example, unceasing. Chu Ming-kin shows that the road to autocracy was anything but linear. In fact, during the Northern Song dynasty, competition and compromises over diverse agendas constantly altered the political landscape.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on April 09, 2020).

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