What price Hollywood? : gender and sex in the films of George Cukor / Elyce Rae Helford.

By: Helford, Elyce Rae, 1962- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2020Description: 1 online resource (1 volume) : illustrations (black and white)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813179315; 0813179319Subject(s): Sex in motion pictures | Sex role in motion picturesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: What price Hollywood?DDC classification: 791.430233092 LOC classification: PN1998.3.C8 | H45 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The women's director and women's friendship -- Collaboration and chastisement: Cukor directs Hepburn -- Tone, genre, and the actor's director -- Masculinity and the man who drinks -- Edelkayt: a Jewish angle on the Cukor male -- The theatricality of gender and drag performance -- Queer musical excess -- Race, nation, and gendered noir anxiety -- Ethnic assimilation and 1950s Hollywood.
Summary: "The gay son of middle-class Hungarian-Jewish immigrants, George Cukor became fascinated with the theater before moving to Hollywood to become a speech coach in the early days of the sound era. Before he died in 1983, he was the noted director of nearly fifty films over a fifty-year period (1931-1981). He found steady success during Hollywood's Golden Age and beyond, including an Oscar for Best Director in 1964 for My Fair Lady - which many said was to make up for having lost the same award decades earlier for The Philadelphia Story (1940). Yet, Cukor's story is less filled with accolades than with submission to the judgements and labels given to him by the Hollywood system. As gay man, Cukor's queerness was an open secret (much in the manner of other figures of the period like Noêl Coward and Tennessee Williams) but was never proclaimed publicly in either a political or aesthetic sense. Following criticism of his focus on female-centered genres and after receiving flak for directing a woman in a man's role, Cukor quickly learned that his controversial style of directing had to change if he was to prosper. Above all, he wanted to be a Hollywood success story. In What Price Hollywood?: Gender and Sex in the Films of George Cukor, Elyce Rae Helford investigates the many ways in which Cukor's films explore and comment on gender. Influenced by sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and nation, Cukor flourished in the studio system, largely by adhering to the traditions of classical Hollywood cinema. His work has gone underexplored by academics even as he has been praised as a Hollywood "master." He was known as both an "actor's director" and a "woman's director," and he labored to get stars including James Stewart and Judy Garland to deliver superlative performances. Helford uses a broad variety of critical and theoretical lenses to consider such subjects as female friendship, director-star collaboration, Hollywood masculinity, gender performativity, drag acts, queer musical excess, genre boundaries, and the politics of assimilation to illustrate the breadth and depth of available gendered readings of Cukor's films"-- Provided by publisher.
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PN1998.3.C8 H45 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv10h9dmx Available on1151408153

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The women's director and women's friendship -- Collaboration and chastisement: Cukor directs Hepburn -- Tone, genre, and the actor's director -- Masculinity and the man who drinks -- Edelkayt: a Jewish angle on the Cukor male -- The theatricality of gender and drag performance -- Queer musical excess -- Race, nation, and gendered noir anxiety -- Ethnic assimilation and 1950s Hollywood.

"The gay son of middle-class Hungarian-Jewish immigrants, George Cukor became fascinated with the theater before moving to Hollywood to become a speech coach in the early days of the sound era. Before he died in 1983, he was the noted director of nearly fifty films over a fifty-year period (1931-1981). He found steady success during Hollywood's Golden Age and beyond, including an Oscar for Best Director in 1964 for My Fair Lady - which many said was to make up for having lost the same award decades earlier for The Philadelphia Story (1940). Yet, Cukor's story is less filled with accolades than with submission to the judgements and labels given to him by the Hollywood system. As gay man, Cukor's queerness was an open secret (much in the manner of other figures of the period like Noêl Coward and Tennessee Williams) but was never proclaimed publicly in either a political or aesthetic sense. Following criticism of his focus on female-centered genres and after receiving flak for directing a woman in a man's role, Cukor quickly learned that his controversial style of directing had to change if he was to prosper. Above all, he wanted to be a Hollywood success story. In What Price Hollywood?: Gender and Sex in the Films of George Cukor, Elyce Rae Helford investigates the many ways in which Cukor's films explore and comment on gender. Influenced by sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and nation, Cukor flourished in the studio system, largely by adhering to the traditions of classical Hollywood cinema. His work has gone underexplored by academics even as he has been praised as a Hollywood "master." He was known as both an "actor's director" and a "woman's director," and he labored to get stars including James Stewart and Judy Garland to deliver superlative performances. Helford uses a broad variety of critical and theoretical lenses to consider such subjects as female friendship, director-star collaboration, Hollywood masculinity, gender performativity, drag acts, queer musical excess, genre boundaries, and the politics of assimilation to illustrate the breadth and depth of available gendered readings of Cukor's films"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elyce Rae Helford is associate professor of English at Middle Tennessee State University in Murtreesboro, Tennessee. She is also the author of Enterprise Zones: Critical Positions on Star Trek.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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