The Sociology of Privatized Security.

By: Swed, OriContributor(s): Crosbie, ThomasMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing AG, 2018Copyright date: ©2019Description: 1 online resource (288 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319982229Subject(s): Social security | Privatization-Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Sociology of Privatized SecurityDDC classification: 368.43 LOC classification: H1-970.9Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Dedication -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- List of Tables -- Chapter 1: Introduction: Sociology and the Privatization of Security -- Why Do We Need a Sociology of Privatized Security? -- Sociology Meets Privatized Security -- Overview of Chapters -- Toward a Sociology of Privatized Security -- Works Cited -- Part I: Examining the Trend -- Chapter 2: Why Privatize: The Reasons Rulers Today Buy, Rent, or Create Private Militaries -- Private Armies of the Past -- The Rise and Consequences of Conscription -- The Demise of Conscription -- Why Rich Countries Employ Mercenaries in the Twenty-First Century -- Why Rulers of Weak Countries Employ Mercenaries in the Twenty-First Century -- The Future of Mercenaries in the Twenty-First Century -- Works Cited -- Chapter 3: From Mercenaries to Private Patriots: Nationalism and the Private Military Contractors -- Introduction -- PMSCs and Ideological Change -- PMSCs and Nation-States -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 4: Legitimacy Building in Policy and Practice: The Case of US Private Military and Security Contractors (PMSCs) in Afghanistan -- Legitimacy, Counterinsurgency, and the Challenges of Ambiguity -- The Challenges of Building Legitimacy -- The Ambiguity of PMSCs -- Mission to Afghanistan -- Mission to the United States of America -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Part II: Privatization and the State's Monopoly on Violence -- Chapter 5: The Expansion of the US Military's Civilian Periphery and Corollary Progressive Changes in US Military Law -- How Military Law Regulates Behavior in a Combat Environment -- Private Military Firms: Too Private for Military Law -- Too Military for Civilian Law -- "Equality Under [Military] Law" -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 6: Reserve Forces and the Privatization of the Military by the Nation State.
Introduction -- The UK Armed Forces Reserves -- Military and Security Privatization in the UK -- Keeping Enough in Reserve -- Reservist Negotiations, Military Benefits -- PMSC Parallels -- Individualization -- Discussion and Conclusions -- Works Cited -- Chapter 7: Making Markets Responsible: Revisiting the State Monopoly on the Legitimate Use of Force -- Introduction -- The State Monopoly on Legitimate Use of Force as a Practical Category -- Dennis v. the Norwegian Refugee Council: Displacing the State Monopoly on the Legitimate Use of Force -- Anti-Politics: Recognizing the Deepening Commercial-Military Authority -- Vanishing Alter-Politics? Of Conspiracies and Advertising -- Conclusion: The Politics of the "State Monopoly on the Legitimate Use of Force" -- Works Cited -- Part III: The State and the Contractors -- Chapter 8: Gendered Companies, Gendered Security -- Introduction -- Gendered Work in Private Military and Security Companies -- The Gendered Nature of Neoliberal Transformation in the PMSC Industry -- Inside Private Security: Firsthand Accounts of Gender -- Calls for Governance and Changes Regarding Gender Issues in PMSC -- Data and Methods -- Gendered Conversations with Industry Leaders -- Gendered PMSC Workers -- Gender in PMSC Environments -- Gender in Industry Efforts -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 9: The Specter and Labor of the Black Poor in South Africa's Private Security Industry -- Introduction -- The Privatization of Security Services in South Africa -- Specter of the Black Poor -- Black Labor -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 10: Who Are the Private Military and Security Contractors? A Window to a New Profession -- Private Military and Security Companies -- Data Source and Collection -- Results -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Part IV: Conclusion.
Chapter 11: Trendlines: Privatization and the Future of War and Security -- State and Power -- Military Sociology -- Privatization and Inequality -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Index.
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Intro -- Dedication -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- List of Tables -- Chapter 1: Introduction: Sociology and the Privatization of Security -- Why Do We Need a Sociology of Privatized Security? -- Sociology Meets Privatized Security -- Overview of Chapters -- Toward a Sociology of Privatized Security -- Works Cited -- Part I: Examining the Trend -- Chapter 2: Why Privatize: The Reasons Rulers Today Buy, Rent, or Create Private Militaries -- Private Armies of the Past -- The Rise and Consequences of Conscription -- The Demise of Conscription -- Why Rich Countries Employ Mercenaries in the Twenty-First Century -- Why Rulers of Weak Countries Employ Mercenaries in the Twenty-First Century -- The Future of Mercenaries in the Twenty-First Century -- Works Cited -- Chapter 3: From Mercenaries to Private Patriots: Nationalism and the Private Military Contractors -- Introduction -- PMSCs and Ideological Change -- PMSCs and Nation-States -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 4: Legitimacy Building in Policy and Practice: The Case of US Private Military and Security Contractors (PMSCs) in Afghanistan -- Legitimacy, Counterinsurgency, and the Challenges of Ambiguity -- The Challenges of Building Legitimacy -- The Ambiguity of PMSCs -- Mission to Afghanistan -- Mission to the United States of America -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Part II: Privatization and the State's Monopoly on Violence -- Chapter 5: The Expansion of the US Military's Civilian Periphery and Corollary Progressive Changes in US Military Law -- How Military Law Regulates Behavior in a Combat Environment -- Private Military Firms: Too Private for Military Law -- Too Military for Civilian Law -- "Equality Under [Military] Law" -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 6: Reserve Forces and the Privatization of the Military by the Nation State.

Introduction -- The UK Armed Forces Reserves -- Military and Security Privatization in the UK -- Keeping Enough in Reserve -- Reservist Negotiations, Military Benefits -- PMSC Parallels -- Individualization -- Discussion and Conclusions -- Works Cited -- Chapter 7: Making Markets Responsible: Revisiting the State Monopoly on the Legitimate Use of Force -- Introduction -- The State Monopoly on Legitimate Use of Force as a Practical Category -- Dennis v. the Norwegian Refugee Council: Displacing the State Monopoly on the Legitimate Use of Force -- Anti-Politics: Recognizing the Deepening Commercial-Military Authority -- Vanishing Alter-Politics? Of Conspiracies and Advertising -- Conclusion: The Politics of the "State Monopoly on the Legitimate Use of Force" -- Works Cited -- Part III: The State and the Contractors -- Chapter 8: Gendered Companies, Gendered Security -- Introduction -- Gendered Work in Private Military and Security Companies -- The Gendered Nature of Neoliberal Transformation in the PMSC Industry -- Inside Private Security: Firsthand Accounts of Gender -- Calls for Governance and Changes Regarding Gender Issues in PMSC -- Data and Methods -- Gendered Conversations with Industry Leaders -- Gendered PMSC Workers -- Gender in PMSC Environments -- Gender in Industry Efforts -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 9: The Specter and Labor of the Black Poor in South Africa's Private Security Industry -- Introduction -- The Privatization of Security Services in South Africa -- Specter of the Black Poor -- Black Labor -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Chapter 10: Who Are the Private Military and Security Contractors? A Window to a New Profession -- Private Military and Security Companies -- Data Source and Collection -- Results -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Part IV: Conclusion.

Chapter 11: Trendlines: Privatization and the Future of War and Security -- State and Power -- Military Sociology -- Privatization and Inequality -- Conclusion -- Works Cited -- Index.

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