Creating our own : folklore, performance, and identity in Cuzco, Peru / Zoila S. Mendoza.

By: Mendoza, Zoila S, 1960- [author.]Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Original language: Spanish Series: JSTOR eBooks; Duke backfilePublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2008Edition: [English ed.]Description: 1 online resource (xvii, 234 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822388852; 0822388855Subject(s): Folklore -- Peru -- Cuzco | Folklore -- Performance -- Peru -- Cuzco | Ethnicity -- Peru -- Cuzco | National characteristics, Peruvian | Nationalism -- Peru -- CuzcoAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Creating our own.DDC classification: 398.20985 LOC classification: GR133.P4 | M46 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Revisiting Indigenismo and Folklore -- The Mision Peruana de Arte Incaico and the Development of Artistic-Folkloric Production in Cuzco -- The Rise of Cultural Institutions and Contests -- Touristic Cuzco, Its Monuments, and Its Folklore -- La Hora del Charango: The Cholo Feeling, Cuzquenoness, and Peruvianness -- Creative Effervescence and the Consolidation of Spaces for "Folklore" -- Epilogue: Who Will Represent What Is Our Own? Some Paradoxes of Andean Folklore Both Inside and Outside Peru.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Analyzes the key role that the production of "folkloric" music, dance, and drama has had in the formation of ethnic/racial identities, regionalism, and nationalism in Cuzco, Peru during the twentieth century.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
GR133.P4 M46 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv11sn2kr Available ocn191855685

"This text was originally conceived, written, and published in Spanish"--Page [xi].

Introduction: Revisiting Indigenismo and Folklore -- The Mision Peruana de Arte Incaico and the Development of Artistic-Folkloric Production in Cuzco -- The Rise of Cultural Institutions and Contests -- Touristic Cuzco, Its Monuments, and Its Folklore -- La Hora del Charango: The Cholo Feeling, Cuzquenoness, and Peruvianness -- Creative Effervescence and the Consolidation of Spaces for "Folklore" -- Epilogue: Who Will Represent What Is Our Own? Some Paradoxes of Andean Folklore Both Inside and Outside Peru.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 221-228) and index.

Includes discography: page 219.

Print version record.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Analyzes the key role that the production of "folkloric" music, dance, and drama has had in the formation of ethnic/racial identities, regionalism, and nationalism in Cuzco, Peru during the twentieth century.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This fascinating, well-written study of musical, dance, and theatrical performances practiced in urban Cuzco in southern Peru during the early 20th century outlines the historical and structural realities of the times and the processes in which they were embedded, including the development of Machu Picchu and other archaeological sites as tourist attractions, and the attempts of the neo-indigenist elite movement to create a national identity based on a mixture of indigenous and mestizo elements. Nevertheless, Mendoza (Univ. of California, Davis) asserts repeatedly that readers should not see the creativity of individual artists such as the harpist Manuel Pillco and organizations such as the Qosqo Center of Native Art as merely reflecting the rhetoric surrounding and institutions devoted to nationalism but, rather, as playing a key role in shaping them. In concentrating on "how the result of such a complex mix of traditions, comprising a significant part of the social and political interactions of the different sectors of Cuzco, took on a life of its own and developed its own rationale," Mendoza illuminates a rich time of cultural production that continues to have an ongoing influence on hemispheric and even global indigenous identity formation. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. K. S. Fine-Dare Fort Lewis College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Zoila S. Mendoza is Professor of Native American Studies at the University of California, Davis. She is the author of Shaping Society through Dance: Mestizo Ritual Performance in the Peruvian Andes .


There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.