The black market : the slave's value in national culture after 1865 / Aaron Carico.

By: Carico, Aaron [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksStudies in United States culture: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, [2020]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469655604; 1469655608; 9781469655598; 1469655594Subject(s): Freedmen -- United States -- Social conditions | Freedmen -- United States -- Economic conditions | Slavery -- Economic aspects -- United States | Black market -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Black market.DDC classification: 306.3/620973 LOC classification: E185.61 | .C265 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Introduction: The Unabolished -- Chapter One. Freedom as Accumulation -- Chapter Two. The Spectacle of Free Black Personhood -- Chapter Three. Cowboys and Slaves -- Chapter Four. Southern Enclosure as American Literature -- Conclusion: In the Trap -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W
Summary: "By 1860, the value of the slave population in the United States exceeded $3 billion--triple that of investments nationwide in factories, railroads, and banks combined, and worth more even than the South's lucrative farmland. The slave was not only a commodity to be traded but also a kind of currency and the basis for a range of credit relations. But the value associated with slavery was not destroyed in the Civil War. In Black Market, Aaron Carico reveals how the slave commodity survived emancipation, arguing that the enslaved person--understood here in legal, economic, social, and embodied contexts--still operated as an indispensable form of value in national culture. Carico explains how a radically incomplete--and fundamentally failed--abolition enabled the emergence of a modern nation-state, in which slavery still determined--and now goes on to determine--economic, political, and cultural life"-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E185.61 .C265 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469655604_carico Available on1152595602

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"By 1860, the value of the slave population in the United States exceeded $3 billion--triple that of investments nationwide in factories, railroads, and banks combined, and worth more even than the South's lucrative farmland. The slave was not only a commodity to be traded but also a kind of currency and the basis for a range of credit relations. But the value associated with slavery was not destroyed in the Civil War. In Black Market, Aaron Carico reveals how the slave commodity survived emancipation, arguing that the enslaved person--understood here in legal, economic, social, and embodied contexts--still operated as an indispensable form of value in national culture. Carico explains how a radically incomplete--and fundamentally failed--abolition enabled the emergence of a modern nation-state, in which slavery still determined--and now goes on to determine--economic, political, and cultural life"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Cover -- Contents -- Introduction: The Unabolished -- Chapter One. Freedom as Accumulation -- Chapter Two. The Spectacle of Free Black Personhood -- Chapter Three. Cowboys and Slaves -- Chapter Four. Southern Enclosure as American Literature -- Conclusion: In the Trap -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W

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