Every hill a burial place : the Peace Corps murder trial in East Africa / Peter H. Reid.

By: Reid, Peter H, 1942- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Lexington, Kentucky : The University Press of Kentucky, 2020Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813179988; 081317998X; 9780813180014; 0813180015; 9780813180007; 0813180007Subject(s): Trials (Murder) -- Tanzania | Volunteer workers in social service -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- TanzaniaAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Every hill a burial place.DDC classification: 345.67802523 LOC classification: KTT3.7 K56 | R45 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- A Volunteer Is Dead -- A Lovely, Creative Woman and an All-American Boy from the South -- A Tale of Three Cities -- Government Officials Clarify the Situation: Autopsies Are Performed -- Peace Corps Officials Visit Scene, Bail Is Sought, Peppy's Body Is Flown -- to Dar es Salaam -- Life in Prison for Bill -- The Peace Corps and Tanzania -- Peace Corps Officials Assess the Situation and Plan Future Action -- Syracuse University Training and Marriage -- Peace Corps Training in Tanzania, Binza Upper Primary School -- Friends of Peppy -- The Peace Corps and Criminal Defense -- The Preliminary Inquiry -- Peace Corps Faces Challenges -- Tanzanian Criminal Law -- McHugh and Singh Re-create the Scene of Peppy's Death -- Trial Preparation after the Preliminary Inquiry -- Medical Analysis by Dr. Tom McHugh -- The Trial Begins in Mwanza -- Trial Day One: Friday, August 26, 1966 -- Trial Day Two: Saturday, August 27, 1966 -- Trial Day Three: Monday, August 29, 1966 -- Trial Day Four: Tuesday, August 30, 1966 -- The Peace Corps Book Locker -- Trial Day Five: Wednesday, August 31, 1966 -- Trial Day Six: Thursday, September 1, 1966 -- Trial Day Seven: Friday, September 2, 1966 -- Trial Day Eight: Saturday, September 3, 1966 -- Trial Day Nine: Sunday, September 4, 1966 -- Trial Day Ten: Monday, September 5, 1966 -- Trial Day Eleven: Tuesday, September 6, 1966 -- Trial Day Twelve: Wednesday, September 7, 1966 -- Trial Day Thirteen: Thursday, September 8, 1966 -- Trial Day Fourteen: Friday, September 9, 1966 -- Trial Day Fifteen: Saturday, September 10, 1966 -- Trial Day Sixteen: Monday, September 12, 1966 -- Trial Day Seventeen: Friday, September 16, 1966 -- Trial Day Eighteen: Monday, September 19, 1966 -- Conclusion
Summary: "On March 28, 1966, Peace Corps personnel in Tanzania received word that volunteer Peppy Kinsey had fallen to her death while rock climbing during a picnic. Local authorities arrested Kinsey's husband, Bill, and charged him with murder as witnesses came forward claiming to have seen the pair engaged in a struggle. The incident had the potential to be disastrous for both the Peace Corps and the newly independent nation of Tanzania. Because of the high stakes surrounding the trial, questions remain as to whether there was more behind the final "not guilty" verdict than was apparent on the surface. Peter H. Reid, who served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Tanzania at the time of the Kinsey murder trial, draws on his considerable legal experience to expose inconsistencies and biases in the case. He carefully scrutinizes the evidence and the investigation records, providing insight into the motives and actions of both the Peace Corps representatives and the Tanzanian government officials involved. Reid does not attempt to prove the verdict wrong but critically examines the events of Kinsey's death, her husband's trial, and the aftermath through a variety of cultural and political perspectives. This compelling account sheds new light on a notable yet overlooked international incident involving non-state actors in the Cold War era. Meticulously researched and replete with intricate detail, Every Hill a Burial Place explores the possibility that the course of justice was compromised and offers a commentary on the delicacy of cross-national and cross-cultural diplomacy"-- Provided by publisher.
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KTT3.7 K56 R45 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv13pk8rv Available on1163632257

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- A Volunteer Is Dead -- A Lovely, Creative Woman and an All-American Boy from the South -- A Tale of Three Cities -- Government Officials Clarify the Situation: Autopsies Are Performed -- Peace Corps Officials Visit Scene, Bail Is Sought, Peppy's Body Is Flown -- to Dar es Salaam -- Life in Prison for Bill -- The Peace Corps and Tanzania -- Peace Corps Officials Assess the Situation and Plan Future Action -- Syracuse University Training and Marriage -- Peace Corps Training in Tanzania, Binza Upper Primary School -- Friends of Peppy -- The Peace Corps and Criminal Defense -- The Preliminary Inquiry -- Peace Corps Faces Challenges -- Tanzanian Criminal Law -- McHugh and Singh Re-create the Scene of Peppy's Death -- Trial Preparation after the Preliminary Inquiry -- Medical Analysis by Dr. Tom McHugh -- The Trial Begins in Mwanza -- Trial Day One: Friday, August 26, 1966 -- Trial Day Two: Saturday, August 27, 1966 -- Trial Day Three: Monday, August 29, 1966 -- Trial Day Four: Tuesday, August 30, 1966 -- The Peace Corps Book Locker -- Trial Day Five: Wednesday, August 31, 1966 -- Trial Day Six: Thursday, September 1, 1966 -- Trial Day Seven: Friday, September 2, 1966 -- Trial Day Eight: Saturday, September 3, 1966 -- Trial Day Nine: Sunday, September 4, 1966 -- Trial Day Ten: Monday, September 5, 1966 -- Trial Day Eleven: Tuesday, September 6, 1966 -- Trial Day Twelve: Wednesday, September 7, 1966 -- Trial Day Thirteen: Thursday, September 8, 1966 -- Trial Day Fourteen: Friday, September 9, 1966 -- Trial Day Fifteen: Saturday, September 10, 1966 -- Trial Day Sixteen: Monday, September 12, 1966 -- Trial Day Seventeen: Friday, September 16, 1966 -- Trial Day Eighteen: Monday, September 19, 1966 -- Conclusion

"On March 28, 1966, Peace Corps personnel in Tanzania received word that volunteer Peppy Kinsey had fallen to her death while rock climbing during a picnic. Local authorities arrested Kinsey's husband, Bill, and charged him with murder as witnesses came forward claiming to have seen the pair engaged in a struggle. The incident had the potential to be disastrous for both the Peace Corps and the newly independent nation of Tanzania. Because of the high stakes surrounding the trial, questions remain as to whether there was more behind the final "not guilty" verdict than was apparent on the surface. Peter H. Reid, who served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Tanzania at the time of the Kinsey murder trial, draws on his considerable legal experience to expose inconsistencies and biases in the case. He carefully scrutinizes the evidence and the investigation records, providing insight into the motives and actions of both the Peace Corps representatives and the Tanzanian government officials involved. Reid does not attempt to prove the verdict wrong but critically examines the events of Kinsey's death, her husband's trial, and the aftermath through a variety of cultural and political perspectives. This compelling account sheds new light on a notable yet overlooked international incident involving non-state actors in the Cold War era. Meticulously researched and replete with intricate detail, Every Hill a Burial Place explores the possibility that the course of justice was compromised and offers a commentary on the delicacy of cross-national and cross-cultural diplomacy"-- Provided by publisher.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Peter H. Reid , retired founding director of the Community Law Clinic at Stanford Law School, previously served for more than thirty years as executive director of the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County. He lives in Olympia, Washington, and Santa Cruz, California, with his wife Barbara.

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