A doctor for rural America : the reforms of Frances Sage Bradley / Barbara Barksdale Clowse.

By: Clowse, Barbara Barksdale [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Lexington, Kentucky : The University Press of Kentucky, [2020]Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813179797; 0813179793; 9780813179803; 0813179807Subject(s): Health services accessibility -- United States | Medical policy -- Social aspects -- Biography | Child health services -- United States | Equality -- Health aspects -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Doctor for rural America.DDC classification: 362.10973 LOC classification: RA393 | .C55 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Contents -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 -- Chapter 2 -- Chapter 3 -- Chapter 4 -- Chapter 5 -- Chapter 6 -- Chapter 7 -- Chapter 8 -- Chapter 9 -- Chapter 10 -- Chapter 11 -- Chapter 12 -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- Blank Page -- Blank Page
Summary: "Dr. Frances Sage Bradley (1862-1949) was a mediating force between the urban world of her own education and experience, and that of rural Americans. As a widow with four young children, Bradley trained as a doctor and became one of the first women to graduate from Cornell University Medical School. During the height of the Progressive Era, she left her private practice to do significant field work for the newly-created Children's Bureau, working mainly in the Appalachian South. In this timely biography, Barbara Barksdale Clowse details the story of this physician, reformer, and writer, and her efforts to extend access to healthcare to rural communities. Clowse describes Bradley's important innovations in the field of public health, including physical exams or "conferences" for children and infants which simultaneously educated parents and local medical practitioners, and her advocacy for improved nutrition and modern medicine in rural areas. Finally, Clowse illustrates how Bradley's work regarding maternal mortality and morbidity in America was instrumental in demonstrating the need for what became the Sheppard-Towner Act of 1921, also known as the Maternity and Infancy Protection Act. A century has passed since Bradley lived out her commitment to social justice in healthcare, yet many of the issues that she faced still plague the United States today. A Doctor for Rural America presents a balanced portrait of an overlooked pioneer and her work to establish healthcare as an obligation that the government owed to its citizens"-- Provided by publisher.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RA393 .C55 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv13xpr94 Available on1165623559

"Dr. Frances Sage Bradley (1862-1949) was a mediating force between the urban world of her own education and experience, and that of rural Americans. As a widow with four young children, Bradley trained as a doctor and became one of the first women to graduate from Cornell University Medical School. During the height of the Progressive Era, she left her private practice to do significant field work for the newly-created Children's Bureau, working mainly in the Appalachian South. In this timely biography, Barbara Barksdale Clowse details the story of this physician, reformer, and writer, and her efforts to extend access to healthcare to rural communities. Clowse describes Bradley's important innovations in the field of public health, including physical exams or "conferences" for children and infants which simultaneously educated parents and local medical practitioners, and her advocacy for improved nutrition and modern medicine in rural areas. Finally, Clowse illustrates how Bradley's work regarding maternal mortality and morbidity in America was instrumental in demonstrating the need for what became the Sheppard-Towner Act of 1921, also known as the Maternity and Infancy Protection Act. A century has passed since Bradley lived out her commitment to social justice in healthcare, yet many of the issues that she faced still plague the United States today. A Doctor for Rural America presents a balanced portrait of an overlooked pioneer and her work to establish healthcare as an obligation that the government owed to its citizens"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on July 27, 2020).

Front Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Contents -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 -- Chapter 2 -- Chapter 3 -- Chapter 4 -- Chapter 5 -- Chapter 6 -- Chapter 7 -- Chapter 8 -- Chapter 9 -- Chapter 10 -- Chapter 11 -- Chapter 12 -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index -- Blank Page -- Blank Page

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Barbara Barksdale Clowse is a former professor of history at both UNC Greensboro and North Carolina A&T State. She is the author of Brainpower for the Cold War: The Sputnik Crisis and National Defense Education Act of 1958 , Ralph McGill: A Biography, and Women, Decision Making, and the Future . She lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.