Remaking Islam in African Portugal : Lisbon--Mecca--Bissau / Michelle C. Johnson.

By: Johnson, Michelle C [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksFraming the global book series: Publisher: Bloomington, Indiana : Indiana University Press, [2020]Copyright date: ©2020Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780253052766; 0253052769; 9780253049780; 0253049784Subject(s): Islam -- PortugalAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 325.469 LOC classification: JV8261Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Note on Transcription -- 1. Faith and Fieldwork in African Lisbon -- Part I. Remaking Islam through Life-Course Rituals -- 2. Name-Giving and Hand-Writing: Childhood Rituals and Embodying Islam -- 3. Making Mandinga, Making Muslims: Initiation, Circumcision, and Ritual Uncertainty -- 4. Distant Departures: Funerals, Postburial Sacrifices, and Rupturing Place and Identity -- Part II. Remaking Islam through Rituals beyond the Life Course -- 5. Reversals of Fortune: From Healing-Divining to Astrology
6. "Welcome Back from Mecca!": Reimagining the Hajj -- Epilogue: Faith, Food, and Fashion-Religion in Diaspora -- Bibliography -- Index -- About the Author
Summary: When Guinean Muslims leave their homeland, they encounter radically new versions of Islam and new approaches to religion more generally. In Remaking Islam in African Portugal, Michelle C. Johnson explores the religious lives of these migrants in the context of diaspora. Since Islam arrived in West Africa centuries ago, Muslims in this region have long conflated ethnicity and Islam, such that to be Mandinga or Fula is also to be Muslim. But as they increasingly encounter Muslims not from Africa, as well as other ways of being Muslim, they must question and revise their understanding of "proper" Muslim belief and practice. Many men, in particular, begin to separate African custom from global Islam. Johnson maintains that this cultural intersection is highly gendered as she shows how Guinean Muslim men in Lisbon'especially those who can read Arabic, have made the pilgrimage to Mecca, and attend Friday prayer at Lisbon's central mosque'aspire to be cosmopolitan Muslims. By contrast, Guinean women'many of whom never studied the Qur'an, do not read Arabic, and feel excluded from the mosque'remain more comfortably rooted in African custom. In response, these women have created a "culture club" as an alternative Muslim space where they can celebrate life course rituals and Muslim holidays on their own terms. Remaking Islam in African Portugal highlights what being Muslim means in urban Europe and how Guinean migrants' relationships to their ritual practices must change as they remake themselves and their religion.
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JV8261 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctv14npk3p Available on1183855239

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (EBSCO, viewed August 17, 2020).

Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Note on Transcription -- 1. Faith and Fieldwork in African Lisbon -- Part I. Remaking Islam through Life-Course Rituals -- 2. Name-Giving and Hand-Writing: Childhood Rituals and Embodying Islam -- 3. Making Mandinga, Making Muslims: Initiation, Circumcision, and Ritual Uncertainty -- 4. Distant Departures: Funerals, Postburial Sacrifices, and Rupturing Place and Identity -- Part II. Remaking Islam through Rituals beyond the Life Course -- 5. Reversals of Fortune: From Healing-Divining to Astrology

6. "Welcome Back from Mecca!": Reimagining the Hajj -- Epilogue: Faith, Food, and Fashion-Religion in Diaspora -- Bibliography -- Index -- About the Author

When Guinean Muslims leave their homeland, they encounter radically new versions of Islam and new approaches to religion more generally. In Remaking Islam in African Portugal, Michelle C. Johnson explores the religious lives of these migrants in the context of diaspora. Since Islam arrived in West Africa centuries ago, Muslims in this region have long conflated ethnicity and Islam, such that to be Mandinga or Fula is also to be Muslim. But as they increasingly encounter Muslims not from Africa, as well as other ways of being Muslim, they must question and revise their understanding of "proper" Muslim belief and practice. Many men, in particular, begin to separate African custom from global Islam. Johnson maintains that this cultural intersection is highly gendered as she shows how Guinean Muslim men in Lisbon'especially those who can read Arabic, have made the pilgrimage to Mecca, and attend Friday prayer at Lisbon's central mosque'aspire to be cosmopolitan Muslims. By contrast, Guinean women'many of whom never studied the Qur'an, do not read Arabic, and feel excluded from the mosque'remain more comfortably rooted in African custom. In response, these women have created a "culture club" as an alternative Muslim space where they can celebrate life course rituals and Muslim holidays on their own terms. Remaking Islam in African Portugal highlights what being Muslim means in urban Europe and how Guinean migrants' relationships to their ritual practices must change as they remake themselves and their religion.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michelle C. Johnson is a cultural anthropologist who specializes in religion and ritual in West Africa and among African immigrants in Europe. She has conducted extensive fieldwork with Muslims in Guinea-Bissau and with Guinean Muslim immigrants in Lisbon, Portugal. She has held grants from the Social Science Research Council, the Department of Education (Fulbright-Hays), and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and has authored numerous articles and book chapters, including "'Never Forget Where You're From': Raising Guinean Muslim Babies in Portugal" in A World of Babies: Imagined Childcare Guides for Eight Societies and "'Nothing Is Sweet in My Mouth': Food, Identity, and Religion in African Portugal." She is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Bucknell University. She was awarded the 2019 Class of 1956 Lectureship for Inspirational Teaching.

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